Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I freak out whenever I open up any STL-related code from Visual Studio's implementation while debugging my code:

// From <xtree>

if (_Where == begin())
    {   // insert at beginning if before first element
    if (_DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp,
        this->_Kfn(_Val), _Key(_Where._Mynode())))
        return (_Insert(true, _Where._Mynode(), _Val));
    }
else if (_Where == end())
    {   // insert at end if after last element
    if (_DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp,
        _Key(_Rmost()), this->_Kfn(_Val)))
        return (_Insert(false, _Rmost(), _Val));
    }
//...
else if (_DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp,
    _Key(_Where._Mynode()), this->_Kfn(_Val))
    && (++(_Next = _Where) == end()
        || _DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp,
            this->_Kfn(_Val), _Key(_Next._Mynode()))))
    {   // insert after _Where
    if (_Isnil(_Right(_Where._Mynode())))
        return (_Insert(false, _Where._Mynode(), _Val));
    else
        return (_Insert(true, _Next._Mynode(), _Val));
    }

The presence of comments makes me feel as though a human wrote them, but the poor formatting, liberal use of underscores at the beginning of everything (why?), and extremely unreadable conditions like (++(_Next = _Where) == end() || _DEBUG_LT_PRED ...) make me feel as though they were generated from another piece of source code, not written as-is.

Does anyone know which of those is the case? (If it was generated from some other piece of code, I'd be interested in knowing how/why this was done.)


For the record, here's the same thing, but "properly formatted":

if (Where == begin())
{
    // insert at beginning if before first element
    if (DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, this->Kfn(Val), Key(Where.Mynode())))
        return (Insert(true, Where.Mynode(), Val));
}
else if (Where == end())
{
    // insert at end if after last element
    if (DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, Key(Rmost()), this->Kfn(Val)))
        return (Insert(false, Rmost(), Val));
}
//...
else if (DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, Key(Where.Mynode()), this->_Kfn(Val))
    && (++(Next = Where) == end()
        || DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, this->_Kfn(Val), Key(Next.Mynode()))))
{
    // insert after Where
    if (Isnil(Right(Where.Mynode())))
        return (Insert(false, Where.Mynode(), Val));
    else
        return (Insert(true, Next.Mynode(), Val));
}

IMHO this is more like how it would turn out if a human wrote it, but then again, I have no idea.

share|improve this question
2  
I suspect those conditions where simply "grown" step-by-step over some years of development. Only to be considered to be readable by someone who is very familiar with the library internals and the idioms used there, with the intention to write not more lines of code than absolutely necessary. Probably the aims of STL designers are quite different from the aims of "application" programmers. –  Doc Brown Aug 23 '11 at 7:14
    
@Doc: 2 words: "oh dear"!! –  Mehrdad Aug 23 '11 at 7:17
1  
All code is human generated in the sense that at least a human gave the instruction on what to output and how it should be formatted. –  Andreas Brinck Aug 23 '11 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Two things:

  1. The indentation is actually fine, although nowadays unusual (and I personally hate it): they use an indentation of four, which is achieved via spaces, but use tabs for all multiples of eight. This used to be the standard almost everywhere (notably it’s still the default setting in several editors such as Vim). But as a consequence, the code is only indented correctly if you set your tab width to 8. So the code actually looks like this:

    else if (_Where == end())
        {   // insert at end if after last element
            if (_DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp,
                _Key(_Rmost()), this->_Kfn(_Val)))
                return (_Insert(false, _Rmost(), _Val));
        }
    

    Which, though still unusual, is perfectly logical and legible.

  2. It’s good style (or even mandated?) that the standard library uses only reserved identifiers to avoid name clashes with customers’ C++ code. These reserved names are either names starting with an underscore followed by a capital letter (_DEBUG_LT_PRED, _Key), or two underscores (not in this code, but the GCC libstdc++ is littered with __x etc.).

Hence the alphabet soup.

But yes, this code is indeed manually written – at least it is in the case of the GCC. The active source branch of the libstdc++ looks exactly like the code above, and isn’t auto-generated.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 very interesting note about point #1, but (2) Why should the identifiers conflict with anything? Aren't there scoping rules in C++? and (3) That still doesn't explain why the if conditions are so ugly/unreadable :\ , and (4) how is this at all related to GCC? –  Mehrdad Aug 23 '11 at 7:10
1  
@Mehrdad: formatting is subjective... –  Matthieu M. Aug 23 '11 at 7:12
4  
@Mehrdad Scoping rules in C++ suck because C++ has macros. Those can destroy everything. About (4): Well, all standard library implementations look a bit like this, for the same two reasons. I’m not sure what your trouble with the if conditions is – besides the fact that they contain debugging code which makes them harder to understand … –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 23 '11 at 7:13
2  
@Konrad: Regarding the ifs: doesn't this look a little unreadable to you, with the extended conditionals and side-effects and all? ... else if (_DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, _Key(_Where._Mynode()), this->_Kfn(_Val)) && (++(_Next = _Where) == end() || _DEBUG_LT_PRED(this->comp, this->_Kfn(_Val), _Key(_Next._Mynode()))))... –  Mehrdad Aug 23 '11 at 7:16
2  
@Mehrdad I don’t think so. Keep in mind, with proper tab width settings it looks like this: gist.github.com/1164541 – very logically indented. Granted, I personally wouldn’t use side effects in conditionals if at all preventable. But your “properly formatted” code also also still has these. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 23 '11 at 7:23

The STL provided by VC++ is written by Dinkumware (and possibly adapted).

As far as I know, it is written by humans, but heavily optimized, which might leave a sour taste in the mouths of maintainers. There is a reason, after all, that we advise beginners not to micro-optimize their code - it makes it hard to read. However, we do expect from a library as essential as the STL to be heavily optimized: we don't have to maintain it anyway.

I myself find it quite readable:

  • Well indented (could never visualize GCC's STL correctly)
  • Commented
  • No mess of preprocessor directives (ala Boost, but obviously it's easier to cater to only one compiler)

You might want to look at libc++ to convince yourself that even a human written library, without legacy code (it's fresh), can get pretty complicated. Example <algorithm> (love the sort algorithm).

share|improve this answer
    
+1... maybe it's just me, though, but I find your linked <algorithm> to be more readable than my <xtree>. All you need to do is take out the leading underscores and it becomes normal. –  Mehrdad Aug 23 '11 at 7:18
    
GCC’s stdlibc++ uses the same indentation conventions (albeit with two spaces instead of 4). What you’ve linked to is LLVM’s implementation, GCC’s looks veery different. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 23 '11 at 7:19
    
@Konrad: Ah thanks, it is therefore a setting issue on my editors! It's a weird convention... really :/ –  Matthieu M. Aug 23 '11 at 7:21
2  
@Matthieu - From what I've heard, Dinkumware has a configuration system that selects the system specific code from a larger codebase. That hides their configuration "macros". –  Bo Persson Aug 23 '11 at 7:33
1  
@Bo: I think the same thing exists for Boost, ie there is an utility to strip the unused parts of the code depending on your compiler(s), I have never played with it though. –  Matthieu M. Aug 23 '11 at 7:53

Original company for the MS STL was Dinkumware. They had this awful code style, and it looks to be still there even though MS no longer use them. I'm sure it's hand written, probably all by the same person, I could name him but I don't think I will.

share|improve this answer
    
lol, +1 for not naming him. xD –  Mehrdad Aug 23 '11 at 7:19
    
Although he does have a pretty interesting series in VCBlog about the STL and how it works. And you will have to, at least, chuckle when you find his name out. –  RedX Aug 23 '11 at 7:33
1  
@RedX - The man with the fitting initials is the MS maintainer, not the original author. –  Bo Persson Aug 23 '11 at 7:44
2  
It's not a shame to write code like this. The goal of STL is to be optimal, it's not on the application level where easiness to read is more important than speed and size. –  vsz Aug 23 '11 at 11:59
2  
Judging by the comments, I'm assuming they are talking about "STL", Steven T Lavavej, who, based on his website, is a pretty cool guy. He's gone by "STL" since before the STL existed. –  David Stone May 5 '12 at 14:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.