Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can we initialize JSON object with a string in C# ;

like: "Person": [{"age":"42","name":"John"}]

as object JsonData = "Person": [{"age":"42","name":"John"}];

???

So that i can give this JSON object directly to the DatacontractJSONSerializer

And i could get the data out of it.!


        List<Person> people = new List<Person>{
                   new Person{age  = 1, name  = "Scott"},
                   new Person{age = 2, name  = "Bill"}
                   };




            string jsonString = ExtensionMethods.JSONHelper.ToJSON(people);


         }

    }
}
namespace ExtensionMethods
{
    public static class JSONHelper
    {
        public static string ToJSON(this object obj)
        {
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            return serializer.Serialize(obj);
        }

        public static string ToJSON(this object obj, int recursionDepth)
        {
            JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            serializer.RecursionLimit = recursionDepth;
            return serializer.Serialize(obj);
        }
    }
}

So,

string jsonString = ExtensionMethods.JSONHelper.ToJSON(people);

Gives a string of : [{},{}]

Empty data structure, Any idea..?

share|improve this question
    
you question can be rephrased as. " How do I initialize a JSON object in C#" –  Gaurav Shah Aug 23 '11 at 7:20
    
yes almost...!! –  pvaju896 Aug 23 '11 at 7:22

1 Answer 1

With extension methods, you want to patch your method onto the type that you intend to call that method against. In this case, IEnumerable is a good place to add methods you want to use on a List:

public class Person {
  public int age { get; set; }
  public string name { get; set; }
}

public static class JSONHelper {
  public static string ToJSON(this IEnumerable obj) {
    return new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);
  }
}

void Main() {
  List<Person> people = new List<Person> {
    new Person() { age = 1, name = "Scott" },
    new Person() { age = 2, name = "Bill" }
  };

  // [{"age":1,"name":"Scott"},{"age":2,"name":"Bill"}]
  string json = people.ToJSON();
}

The important distinction is that you should use the extension method against a variable of the type it's defined against. You shouldn't reference the extension method directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Dave : List<Person> people = new List<Person>{ new Person{age = 1, name = "Scott"}, new Person{age = 2, name = "Bill"} }; string jsonString = people.ToJSON(); } } public static class JSONHelper { public static string ToJSON(this IEnumerable<Person> obj) { return new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj); } } } –  pvaju896 Aug 23 '11 at 8:25
    
DaveWard: the above code still gives me the previous result. [{},{}] –  pvaju896 Aug 23 '11 at 8:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.