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I'm trying to port an application I wrote in java to javascript (actually using coffeescript).

Now, I'm feeling lost.. what do you suggest to do to create class properties? Should I use getter/setters? I don't like to do this:

myObj.prop = "hello"

because I could use non existing properties, and it would be easy to mispell something..

How can I get javascript to be a bit more like java, with private, public final properties etc..? Any suggestion?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you just translate your Java code into JavaScript, you're going to be constantly fighting JavaScript's object model, which is prototype-based, not class-based. There are no private properties on objects, no final properties unless you're using an ES5-compatible engine (you haven't mentioned what your target runtime environment is; browsers aren't use ES5-compatible, it'll be another couple of years), no classes at all in fact.

Instead, I recommend you thoroughly brief yourself on how object orientation actually works in JavaScript, and then build your application fully embracing how JavaScript does it. This is non-trivial, but rewarding.

Some articles that may be of use. I start with closures because really understanding closures is absolutely essential to writing JavaScript, and most "private member" solutions rely on closures. Then I refer to a couple of articles by Douglas Crockford. Crockford is required reading if you're going to work in JavaScript, even if you end up disagreeing with some of his conclusions. Then I point to a couple of articles specifically addressing doing class-like things.

Addressing some of your specific questions:

what do you suggest to do to create class properties? Should I use getter/setters? I don't like to do this:

myObj.prop = "hello"

because I could use non existing properties, and it would be easy to mispell something..

I don't, I prefer using TDD to ensure that if I do have a typo, it gets revealed in testing. (A good code-completing editor will also be helpful here, though really good JavaScript code-completing editors are thin on the ground.) But you're right that getters and setters in the Java sense (methods like getFoo and setFoo) would make it more obvious when you're creating/accessing a property that you haven't defined in advance (e.g., through a typo) by causing a runtime error, calling a function that doesn't exist. (I say "in the Java sense" because JavaScript as of ES5 has a different kind of "getters" and "setters" that are transparent and wouldn't help with that.) So that's an argument for using them. If you do, you might look at using Google's Closure compiler for release builds, as it will inline them.

How can I get javascript to be a bit more like java, with private...

I've linked Crockford's article on private members, and my own which lists other ways. The very basic explanation of the Crockford model is: You use a variable in the context created by the call to your constructor function and a function created within that context (a closure) that has access to it, rather than an object property:

function Foo() {
    var bar;

    function Foo_setBar(b) {
        bar = b;
    }
    function Foo_getBar() {
        return bar;
    }

    this.setBar = Foo_setBar;
    this.getBar = Foo_getBar;
}

bar is not an object property, but the functions defined in the context with it have an enduring reference to it. This is totally fine if you're going to have a smallish number of Foo objects. If you're going to have thousands of Foo objects you might want to reconsider, because each and every Foo object has its own two functions (really genuinely different Function instances) for Foo_getBar and Foo_setBar.

You'll frequently see the above written like this:

function Foo() {
    var bar;

    this.setBar = function(b) {
        bar = b;
    };
    this.getBar = function() {
        return bar;
    };
}

Yes, it's briefer, but now the functions don't have names, and giving your functions names helps your tools help you.

How can I get javascript to be a bit more like java, with...public final properties

You can define a Java-style getter with no setter. Or if your target environment will be ES5-compliant (again, browsers aren't yet, it'll be another couple of years), you could use the new Object.defineProperty feature that allows you to set properties that cannot be written to.

But my main point is to embrace the language and environment in which you're working. Learn it well, and you'll find that different patterns apply than in Java. Both are great languages (I use them both a lot), but they work differently and lead to different solutions.

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You can use module pattern to make private properties and public accessors as one more option.

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This doesn't directly answer your question, but I would abandon the idea of trying to make the JavaScript app like Java. They really are different languages (despite some similarities in syntax and in their name). As a general statement, it makes sense to adopt the idioms of the target language when porting something.

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Currently there are many choices for you , you can check dojo library. In dojo, you can code mostly like java programming

  1. Class
    Javascript doesn’t have a Class system like Java,dojo provide dojo.declare to define a functionality to simulate this. Check this page . There are field variable, constructor method, extend from other class.
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JavaScript has a feature that constructor functions may return any object (not necesserily this). So, your constructor function could just return a proxy object, that allows access only to the public methods of your class. Using this method you can create real protected member, just like in Java (with inheritance, super() call, etc.)

I created a little library to streamline this method: http://idya.github.com/oolib/

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Dojo is one option. I personally prefer Prototype. It also has a framework and API for creating classes and using inheritance in a more "java-ish" way. See the Class.create method in the API. I've used it on multiple webapps I've worked on.

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I mainly agree with @Willie Wheeler that you shouldn't try too hard to make your app like Java - there are ways of using JavaScript to create things like private members etc - Douglas Crockford and others have written about this kind of thing.

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I'm the author of the CoffeeScript book from PragProg. Right now, I use CoffeeScript as my primary language; I got fluent in JavaScript in the course of learning CoffeeScript. But before that, my best language was Java.

So I know what you're going through. Java has a very strong set of best practices that give you a clear idea of what good code is: clean encapsulation, fine-grained exceptions, thorough JavaDocs, and GOF design patterns all over the place. When you switch to JavaScript, that goes right out the window. There are few "best practices," and more of a vague sense of "this is elegant." Then when you start seeing bugs, it's incredibly frustrating—there are no compile-time errors, and far fewer, less precise runtime errors. It's like playing without a net. And while CoffeeScript adds some syntactic sugar that might look familiar to Java coders (notably classes), it's really no less of a leap.

Here's my advice: Learn to write good CoffeeScript/JavaScript code. Trying to make it look like Java is the path to madness (and believe me, many have tried; see: just about any JS code released by Google). Good JS code is more minimalistic. Don't use get/set methods; use exceptions sparingly; and don't use classes or design patterns for everything. JS is ultimately a more expressive language than Java is, and CoffeeScript even moreso. Once you get used to the feeling of danger that comes with it, you'll like it.

One note: JavaScripters are, by and large, terrible when it comes to testing. There are plenty of good JS testing frameworks out there, but robust testing is much rarer than in the Java world. So in that regard, there's something JavaScripters can learn from Java coders. Using TDD would also be a great way of easing your concerns about how easy it is to make errors that, otherwise, wouldn't get caught until some particular part of your application runs.

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