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So numpy has some convenience functions for combining several arrays into one, e.g. hstack and vstack. I'm wondering if there's something similar but for stacking the component arrays diagonally?

Say I have N arrays of shape (n_i, m_i), and I want to combine them into a single array of size (sum_{1,N}n_i, sum_{1,N}m_i) such that the component arrays form blocks on the diagonal of the result array.

And yes, I know how to solve it manually, e.g. with the approach described in How to "embed" a small numpy array into a predefined block of a large numpy array? . Just wondering if there's an easier way.

Ah, How can I transform blocks into a blockdiagonal matrix (NumPy) mentions that scipy.linalg.block_diag() is the solution, except that the version of scipy installed on my workstation is so old it doesn't have it. Any other ideas?

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Update scipy? :) –  jtbandes Aug 23 '11 at 8:31
    
i hope this doesn't seem an insulting comment due to obviousness, but you will not get scipy.linalg just by going import scipy. what is your scipy.__version__ ? –  wim Aug 23 '11 at 8:39
    
@wim: Yes, I know I need to import scipy.linalg. I'm using scipy 0.7. –  janneb Aug 23 '11 at 8:43
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It does seem block_diag does exactly what you want. So if for some reason you can't update scipy, then here is the source from v0.8.0 if you wish to simply define it!

def block_diag(*arrs):
    """Create a block diagonal matrix from the provided arrays.

    Given the inputs `A`, `B` and `C`, the output will have these
    arrays arranged on the diagonal::

        [[A, 0, 0],
         [0, B, 0],
         [0, 0, C]]

    If all the input arrays are square, the output is known as a
    block diagonal matrix.

    Parameters
    ----------
    A, B, C, ... : array-like, up to 2D
        Input arrays.  A 1D array or array-like sequence with length n is
        treated as a 2D array with shape (1,n).

    Returns
    -------
    D : ndarray
        Array with `A`, `B`, `C`, ... on the diagonal.  `D` has the
        same dtype as `A`.

    References
    ----------
    .. [1] Wikipedia, "Block matrix",
           http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_diagonal_matrix

    Examples
    --------
    >>> A = [[1, 0],
    ...      [0, 1]]
    >>> B = [[3, 4, 5],
    ...      [6, 7, 8]]
    >>> C = [[7]]
    >>> print(block_diag(A, B, C))
    [[1 0 0 0 0 0]
     [0 1 0 0 0 0]
     [0 0 3 4 5 0]
     [0 0 6 7 8 0]
     [0 0 0 0 0 7]]
    >>> block_diag(1.0, [2, 3], [[4, 5], [6, 7]])
    array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
           [ 0.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.],
           [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  4.,  5.],
           [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  6.,  7.]])

    """
    if arrs == ():
        arrs = ([],)
    arrs = [np.atleast_2d(a) for a in arrs]

    bad_args = [k for k in range(len(arrs)) if arrs[k].ndim > 2]
    if bad_args:
        raise ValueError("arguments in the following positions have dimension "
                            "greater than 2: %s" % bad_args) 

    shapes = np.array([a.shape for a in arrs])
    out = np.zeros(np.sum(shapes, axis=0), dtype=arrs[0].dtype)

    r, c = 0, 0
    for i, (rr, cc) in enumerate(shapes):
        out[r:r + rr, c:c + cc] = arrs[i]
        r += rr
        c += cc
    return out
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1  
Thanks, this does the trick, and paves the way for a simple replacement when scipy is upgraded. One small fix though; one needs to put "import numpy as np" in the function or module. –  janneb Aug 23 '11 at 8:59
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