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How to print the bit representation of a string

std::string = "\x80";

void print (std::string &s) {

    //How to implement this
}
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Been asked before. What happened to boost.dynamic_bitset? –  dirkgently Apr 3 '09 at 21:40
    
Your other question has been answered as well. –  dirkgently Apr 3 '09 at 21:43
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7 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd vote for bitset:

void pbits(std::string const& s) { 
    for(std::size_t i=0; i<s.size(); i++) 
        std::cout << std::bitset<CHAR_BIT>(s[i]) << " "; 
} 

int main() {
    pbits("\x80\x70"); 
}
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I'd vote for bitset too. Ooh, hey, I just did :-) –  SCFrench Apr 3 '09 at 23:08
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Little-endian or big-endian?

for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    for (char c = 1; c; c <<= 1) // little bits first
        std::cout << (s[i] & c ? "1" : "0");
for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    for (unsigned char c = 0x80; c; c >>= 1) // big bits first
        std::cout << (s[i] & c ? "1" : "0");

Since I hear some grumbling about portability of assuming that a char is a 8-bit byte in the comments of the other answers...

for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    for (unsigned char c = ~((unsigned char)~0 >> 1); c; c >>= 1)
        std::cout << (s[i] & c ? "1" : "0");

This is written from a very C-ish standpoint... if you're already using C++ with STL, you might as well go the whole way and take advantage of the STL bitset functionality instead of playing with strings.

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why don't you do it the simple way? with this "tricky" thing "~(~(unsigned char)0 >> 1)", you get rid of one implementation defined behavior (assuming CHAR_BIT == 8) just to make use of another one (shifting of negative value). ~(unsigned char)0 will become -1 on a two's complement machine. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 3 '09 at 22:32
    
and if >> sign extends, you will end up doing ~-1 which will become 0 on a two's complement machine. i would just do it simply 1 << (CHAR_BIT -1) works and is much more readable IMHO. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 3 '09 at 22:33
    
(reason is because ~ promotes its operand first. so the unsigned char becomes an int, and the 0 then is ~'ed and on a two's complement machine, that will become -1 finally). well i try to avoid all bit-sex because it's easy to make mistakes. so i just use std::bitset and be done with it :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 3 '09 at 22:38
    
>> doesn't sign-extend because the type is unsigned -- that's what the (unsigned char) is for, and the ~ does not promote it to a signed int (why do you think it does?). IMO it's easier to comprehend this than the CHAR_BIT shifting, but who cares -- with constant folding, it's all the same. –  ephemient Apr 3 '09 at 23:37
    
Interesting -- the type promotion behavior seems to depend on whether I use a C compiler or a C++ compiler. In any case, I saw the C tag and went for that instead of properly using STL, which is a better option if available. I'll add that to my answer. –  ephemient Apr 4 '09 at 3:50
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Try:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void print(string &s) {
  string::iterator it; 
  int b;

  for (it = s.begin(); it != s.end(); it++) {
    for (b = 128; b; b >>= 1) {
      cout << (*it & b ? 1 : 0); 
    }   
  }
}

int main() {
  string s = "\x80\x02";
  print(s);
}
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functional, but assumes CHAR_BIT == 8. Could be slightly more portable. Also likely could leverage std::for_each to make it more concise. –  Evan Teran Apr 3 '09 at 21:48
    
You're right. I'll vote your answer up. (I'm a novice to C++; in C a char is always 1 byte wide). –  Stephan202 Apr 3 '09 at 21:54
    
Thanks for the +1, but you are mistaken... both C and C++ say that sizeof(char) == 1. However, it says nothing to guarantee that a char is 1 byte big. Which is why CHAR_BIT exists (and does in C's <limits.h> too). –  Evan Teran Apr 3 '09 at 21:57
    
Don't you mean that while a char is always 1 byte, it is not guaranteed that a byte always contains 8 bits? I mean, sizeof returns numbers whose unit is byte, right? –  Stephan202 Apr 3 '09 at 22:03
    
yes, i mis-typed. neither C or C++ guarantee that a byte is 8-bits big. the units of sizeof is in chars, not bytes though :-P. (hence sizeof(char) == 1 by definition). –  Evan Teran Apr 3 '09 at 22:16
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expanding on Stephan202's answer:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <climits>

struct print_bits {
    void operator()(char ch) {
    	for (unsigned b = 1 << (CHAR_BIT - 1); b != 0; b >>= 1) {
    		std::cout << (ch & b ? 1 : 0); 
    	}
    }
};

void print(const std::string &s) {
    std::for_each(s.begin(), s.end(), print_bits());
}

int main() {
    print("\x80\x02");
}
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Easiest solution is next:

const std::string source("test");
std::copy( 
	source.begin(), 
	source.end(), 
	std::ostream_iterator< 
		std::bitset< sizeof( char ) * 8 > >( std::cout, ", " ) );
  • Some stl implementations allow std::setbase() manipulator for base 2.
  • You could write your own manipulator if want most flexible solution than existing.

EDIT:
Oops. Someone already posted similar solution.

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still, +1 for using an STL algorithm. –  SCFrench Apr 3 '09 at 23:09
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I am sorry I marked this as a duplicate. Anyway, to do this:

void printbits(std::string const& s) {
   for_each(s.begin(), s.end(), print_byte());
}

struct print_byte {
     void operator()(char b) {
        unsigned char c = 0, byte = (unsigned char)b;
        for (; byte; byte >>= 1, c <<= 1) c |= (byte & 1);
        for (; c; c >>= 1) cout << (int)(c&1);
    }
};
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If you want to do it manually, you can always use a lookup table. 256 values in a static table is hardly a lot of overhead:

static char* bitValues[] = 
{
"00000000",
"00000001",
"00000010",
"00000011",
"00000100",
....
"11111111"
};

Then printing is a simple matter of:

for (string::const_iterator i = s.begin(); i != s.end(); ++i)
{
    cout << bitValues[*i];
}
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