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I have a Repositry class wich initiates like this:

public ContactRepository(string sqlStr, string username)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(sqlStr))
    {
        ent = new AceoEntities(sqlStr);
        Username = username; 
    }
    else
        new Exception("No sql string is defined");
}

This might not be the best method, but I would like to make sure it's not possible to create an instance off the class without sqlStr.

Then I'm trying to test this:

[TestMethod()]
public void CreateContactRepositoryWithEmtySqlString()
{
    string sqlStr = string.Empty;
    ContactRepository target;

    try
    {
        target = new ContactRepository("kvelland-kk", sqlStr);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("No sql string is defined",e.Message);
    }
}

My question is: Is this the correct way to to this? I' having problems getting this to work.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I prefer GarethOwen's answer (the ExpectedException attribute) or this way:

public void MyTest()
{
    try
    {    
        target = new ContactRepository("kvelland-kk", sqlStr); 

        Assert.Fail("Should have failed with MyExceptionType");
    }
    catch(MyExceptionType){}
}

Checking exception messages is not a good idea. Cause you may get a different message based on the system localisation. Check for the exception type instead. And as Xhalent mentioned don't throw the a Exception, throw a specific type of exception.

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I would rather use the ExpectedException attribute to mark your TestMethod, and throw a more specific type of exception, for example an ArgumentException:

[TestMethod()]
[ExpectedException(typeof(System.ArgumentException))]
public void CreateContactRepositoryWithEmtySqlString()
{
    ContactRepository target = new ContactRepository("kvelland-kk", string.Empty);
}
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1  
Unless the exception you are expecting is a specialized derived exception, catching "any" exception is a bit open to any sort of behavior, so it;s hard to know if you've thrown the exact exception you are expecting. –  Xhalent Aug 23 '11 at 9:53
    
Important point Xhalent - I updated my answer to expect an 'ArgumentException' rather than an 'Exception' –  GarethOwen Aug 23 '11 at 10:18

you forgot the throw the new Exception

throw new Exception("No sql string is defined");

Interestingly, this kind of demonstrates the value of unit tests, as they have shown up a simple coding error easily over looked.

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