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I'm given an SQL query that change the database schema in a certain way. How can I produce an SQL query that will reverse the schema change of the given query, so that executing the original query and the reverse query would have no effect on the schema.

For example, given

ALTER TABLE t ADD COLUMN a INTEGER

I'll produce

ALTER TABLE t DROP COLUMN a

PS, I understand that I might lose some data, for instance if I drop and create a column the data there would be lost. I can withstand this.

PS2, I assume that I can look into the current schema, to find out what dropped column/tables were.

PS3, generic answer is nice, but DB specific answers are OK as well.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is no ready-made, built-in solution for this. You will have to write some code, possibly a lot.

There are a number of "schema diff" type tools out there. You could possibly put one of those into use. For example, create your original schema, make a copy, run the schema-altering command on the copy, then run a reverse schema diff, which should give you the command that undoes the first command. Depending on your exact requirements, you could script this to some degree. But it might be messy.

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Can you name a few open source "schema diff" tools I can use? –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 25 '11 at 18:37
1  
I've used apgdiff in the past, although not for this, of course. –  Peter Eisentraut Aug 25 '11 at 19:54

In the general case, you can't (on PostgreSQL at least) unless you execute a CREATE TABLE statement. For example, let's say you start with this table.

CREATE TABLE wibble (
  a INTEGER,
  b INTEGER,
  c VARCHAR(35),
  d DATE
);

The schema will be recorded like this.

CREATE TABLE wibble
(
  a integer,
  b integer,
  c character varying(35),
  d date
)

Then you drop column "a", and add column "a".

ALTER TABLE wibble DROP COLUMN a;
ALTER TABLE wibble ADD COLUMN a INTEGER;

Now the schema will look like this.

CREATE TABLE wibble
(
  b integer,
  c character varying(35),
  d date,
  a integer
)

Column "a" was the first column; now it's the last. That doesn't matter a bit within relational theory or within SQL, because the order of columns doesn't matter. It matters a lot to a version control system, though.

Dropping a column might also drop constraints, triggers, and indexes.

PostgreSQL will also rewrite your SQL DDL statements into a canonical form. For example, you might write something like this.

CREATE TABLE wibble (
    a INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
...

But PostgreSQL will store something like this instead.

CREATE TABLE wibble
(
  a integer NOT NULL,
  . . .
  CONSTRAINT wibble_pkey PRIMARY KEY (a)
)
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same on TSQL, you have to use the designer to change the order of the column –  Milimetric Aug 25 '11 at 1:11
    
I still can't see why you can't. Maybe you have to look into the schema to recover the order of the original dropped column, but I think you can. And anyway, when adding a column, you definitely can reverse that. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 25 '11 at 4:59
    
Like I said, the CREATE TABLE statement will preserve column order. But you have to store it somewhere outside the system tables. You clearly can't rely on pairs of ALTER TABLE statements to leave the schema that's in the system tables unchanged. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 25 '11 at 6:35
    
@Catcall, maybe it's not in ANSI SQL, but in many sql implementation, you can order the ALTER TABLE statement to insert the column wherever you want, preserving the exact state of the DB. Can you give an example of a DB table you ALTER and cannot absolutely go back, even if you check the current order of the tables? –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 25 '11 at 18:40
    
ALTER TABLE ADD COLUMN by itself might not revert the schema to the previous state, even if you can specify column order. There might be constraints, indexes, and triggers involved. In which case the ALTER TABLE DROP COLUMN statement would fail (except for indexes), giving you fair warning about the need (and the danger) of DROP CASCADE. But if you store the exact state of the schema, you can always go back to that state. (With, perhaps, some loss of data.) And, as far as I know, every SQL dbms gives you some way to extract the schema. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 25 '11 at 22:19

My best bet so far seems, applying the change, and runnign apgdiff on both schemas.

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