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List<string> Getlist()
{
    List<string> mylist;
    for (bool successFlag = false; !successFlag; )  //It will definitely enter the loop once.
    {
        successFlag = true;
        mylist = new List<string>();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            var CDF = GetCDF(); // IEnumerable, each call of GetCDF() gives different result
            if (!CDF.Any())
            {
                fail++;
                successFlag = false;
                break;
            }
            string item = GetNext(CDF);
            mylist.Add(item);
        }
    }
    return mylist; // Here IDE poses an error
}

I guess there is a way to recursively use Getlist() instead of do a for loop and flag retry, maybe some kind of immutable method?

i dont wanna initiate the list outside the loop because i would like to discard the list when successFlag is false;

Discard simply means when successFlag = false, then mylist.removeall. And then start everything over again as fresh, so I am asking for an approach to recursively call GetList() instead of clear the states in the method

Update

do while works!

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3  
I don't see any variable a in your code. –  BoltClock Aug 23 '11 at 11:28
    
typo, corrected –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:28
1  
Your code looks strange. Why call GetCDF in a loop? Will every call return the same enumerable or a different? What does GetNext do? Why do you overwrite mylist in each iteration of the loop? You lose the result of the previous iterations like this. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '11 at 11:30
2  
I find it unusual that you use a "for" loop for boolean checking. Why not instead initialize successFlag before and use while(!successFlag) ? –  RolandK Aug 23 '11 at 11:33
1  
@colinfang: "Looks better IMO": Nope, it doesn't. It looks very strange :) –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '11 at 11:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue has to do with this line. If it doesn't run you List would never be initialized.

for (bool successFlag = true; !successFlag; )

Now if you change your code to this it should work fine.

    List<string> Getlist()
    {
        List<string> mylist= new List<string>();
        for (bool successFlag = true; !successFlag; )
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            {
                var CDF = GetCDF(); // IEnumerable
                if (!CDF.Any())
                {
                    fail++;
                    successFlag = false;
                    break;
                }
                string item = GetNext(CDF);
                mylist.Add(item);
            }
        }
        return mylist;
    }

Update :

Run untill GetCDF(); is not empty. This can cause an infinite loop if GetCDF() is always empty!!!

List<string> Getlist()
{
    List<string> mylist= new List<string>();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        var CDF = GetCDF(); // IEnumerable
        if (!CDF.Any())
        {
                        Thread.Sleep(1000); //Sleep for 1 second.   
            fail++;
            return Getlist();
        }
        string item = GetNext(CDF);
        mylist.Add(item);
    }

    return mylist;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i dont wanna initiate the list outside the loop because i would like to discard the list when successFlag is false; –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:43
    
@colinfang, when you mean discard the list, what do you mean? do you want to null, or the items that are in the list untill the sucessFlag is false. –  Jethro Aug 23 '11 at 11:48
    
simply just like when successFlag = false, then mylist.removeall. And then start everything over again as fresh, so I am asking for an approach to recursively call GetList() instead of clear the states in the method. –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:51
    
@colinfang, see my updated answer. –  Jethro Aug 23 '11 at 12:00
    
Looks nice, i will try it, thx. but why sleep? I can guarantee there will be a valid solution somehow beyond code concept. –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 12:02

First you declare mylist, then you instantiate it inside a loop that could potentially execute zero times (as far as the compiler's static analysis is concerned), then you return it. That causes the error.

Simple solutions:

  • If you want to preserve existing behaviour exactly, then declare and instantiate the list up front, e.g. List<string> mylist = null;
  • If you want to change the behaviour slightly and return a zero-length list instead of null, then move mylist = new List<string>(); outside the loop.
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the first approach is fine, the second one would keep undesired items in the list. (as previous items stored in failed run remain) –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:58

You need to assign a value to mylist outside of the loop. That's what's causing the error in question. The compiler sees that you are returning mylist potentially without ever assigning to it. It doesn't analyze your outer loop to determine that it will always return at least once.

List<string> Getlist()
{
    List<string> mylist = new List<string>();
    for (bool successFlag = true; !successFlag; )
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            var CDF = GetCDF(); // IEnumerable
            if (!CDF.Any())
            {
                fail++;
                successFlag = false;
                break;
            }
            string item = GetNext(CDF);
            mylist.Add(item);
        }
    }
    return mylist;
}

However, there might be other problems. For instance, n is not declared anywhere that we can see from this code example.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it. :) –  Jethro Aug 23 '11 at 11:33
    
i dont wanna initiate the list outside the loop because i would like to discard the list when successFlag is false; –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:42
    
You must initialize it to something outside the loop. Set it to null if you don't want to new it. –  FishBasketGordo Aug 23 '11 at 12:01
    
Or new it and call Clear every iteration. This whole thing does seem a little odd though. Maybe if you elaborate more about what you're actually doing, it might help elicit better advice. –  FishBasketGordo Aug 23 '11 at 12:09

Update: I see you "corrected" the code in question, so the following is not valid anymore...

Your loop basically reads:

        for (bool successFlag = true; false;  ) {
            //do something
        }

The inner instructions will never be executed even once

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Wow. I totally didn't see that. Nice find. (I think the author of the original post has changed this part meanwhile) –  RolandK Aug 23 '11 at 11:42
    
yes, i changed that, but error remains... maybe i should use do while? –  colinfang Aug 23 '11 at 11:46

Because you have

List<string> mylist;

and not

List<string> mylist = null;
share|improve this answer
    
or even var mylist = new List<string>(); –  Rowland Shaw Aug 23 '11 at 11:32

A for loop is evaluated only in case the condition evaluates to true, so if its false then in such scenario it is unassigned.

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It's because you are initializing mylist in the for loop but returning it outside of the for loop. The way you are doing it currently will empty your list on every iteration of the outside loop as well.

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