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First of all, I am using Visual Studio 10 and coding Windows Forms App. I am not experienced with threads in C#.

I have a C# app which uses my C# DLL that listens to a Network Stream, and parses the data it receives. The parsed data is used to insert/update the rows of the Datatable which is bound to the DataGridView that is located on the main form.

I have tried this first with a worker thread which is started inside the DLL. The DataTable which is bound to the DataGridView is passed as a parameter to the DLL. And then the thread starts. The thread function was something like this;

private void ListenThread()

    {
        Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture =
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
        while (m_Active)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100);
            int lData = m_Stream.Read(m_Buffer, 0,
                  m_Client.ReceiveBufferSize);
            String myString = Encoding.UTF7.GetString(m_Buffer);
            myString = myString.Substring(0, lData);
            ParseString(myString);

        }
    }

The ParseString() method parses the data and inserts a row to the DataTable or updates the existing ones.

This code was working well, until I tried to run the app with CTRL+F5 instead of F5. The UI became unresponsive after a few seconds later it began to fill the Grid.

I have googled this and found that I should use BeginInvoke to prevent the UI from freezing. But I was not successful to implement that.

I tried something like

TCPListener Listener = new TCPListener(ListenThread);
IAsyncResult result = Listener.BeginInvoke(null, null);

instead of

Thread m_tidListen = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ListenThread));

but it worked the same way. Still doesnt work with "without debugging mode".

How should I implement this with BeginInvoke? Or should I try something else?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you are building winforms already, you might as well use a BackGroundWorker for this kind of thing. They are made for doing stuff in the Background while keeping your form responsive. For example:

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        //do your time consuming stuff
        while (m_Active)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100);
            int lData = m_Stream.Read(m_Buffer, 0,
                  m_Client.ReceiveBufferSize);
            String myString = Encoding.UTF7.GetString(m_Buffer);
            e.result = myString.Substring(0, lData);

            ParseString(e.Result.ToString());
        }

    }

 private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        //update your UI if needed
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. But in this code, I think it will go to the ParseString() method, after it gets all the data. But the stream does not end. The app will listen to the stream until it is closed. It reads a block of data, parse it, update the Datatable and listen to the stream. This loop continues. –  SCHWARZXXL Aug 23 '11 at 11:59
    
BackGroundWorker, had the same result. The UI gets unresponsive after a few seconds as it did before. What else can be wrong? Is my approach the correct one to populate a DataGridView using the data retrieved from a Network Stream? –  SCHWARZXXL Aug 23 '11 at 12:18
    
@SCHWARZXXL: Hmm.. I think this might be more related to the 'start without debugging' thing. Does it also happen when you run in 'Release' mode? Try to shut down some applications running in the background (like Virus scanners). –  Edwin de Koning Aug 23 '11 at 12:44
    
I will try that. But do you think I should use a BeginInvoke mechanism here? I tried that, too. But i couldn't implement it correctly, I guess. –  SCHWARZXXL Aug 23 '11 at 13:07
    
@SCHWARZXXL: Yes, but I would prefer backgroundworker; It uses the same underlying principles as BeginInvoke, but it is much easier to use. –  Edwin de Koning Aug 23 '11 at 13:21

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