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I have the following JSON File:

   "fields": {
        "x1": {
            "name": "AnExteremLongName"
        },
        "x2": {
            "name": "AnotherExteremLongName"
        },
    },"row": [
        {
            "x1": {
                "name":"Some random Text"
            },
            "x2": {
                "name":"Other random Text"
            }
        }, ....

This is basically a table and to reduce the size of the Json file, the names are extraced into this x values.

I want to get the the Value of "AnExteremLongName" so I have to first get the representive X value. How can I do this without reading all varibles and store them into a "Hashmap"

So basically something like:

String getParamNamebyValue(String ParamValue);
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I suppose you'll have to iterate, as this is backwards from how it's designed to work. Imagine you just have a phonebook and a certain number, and you need to look up the name associated with that number. It's kinda like that. –  Wiseguy Aug 23 '11 at 12:21
    
@Stefan: what would you exactly expect as the return value of getParamNamebyValue("AnExteremLongName")? "fields.x1"? And what if "AnExteremLongName" appears multiple times in the json string? –  Jiri Aug 23 '11 at 13:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll have to iterate through the object properties using for in and compare them. But it is not really fast and I would not recommend it.

Something like this.

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yes, I think so too... would it be better to send the list without this optimization, even if the paramternames could take >10 characters? –  Stefan Aug 23 '11 at 12:28
2  
I'd suggest you don't optimize this in your code but rather just compress the Json you send out. If those things repeat themselves a lot the compression will bring the size down.. –  Tigraine Aug 23 '11 at 12:47
    
+1 for compression. JSON has a quite light footprint so if it's still too large you'll have to work on your data and make use of hashing, pagination to optimize your application. –  Rahman Kalfane Aug 23 '11 at 12:53

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