Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While reading the Doctrine documentation, I found this example:

/**
 * @Entity
 * @InheritanceType("SINGLE_TABLE")
 * @DiscriminatorColumn(name="discr", type="string")
 * @DiscriminatorMap({"person" = "Person", "employee" = "Employee"})
 */
class Person
{
    /**
     * @Id @Column(type="integer")
     * @GeneratedValue
     */
    protected $id;

    /**
     * @Column(type="string", length=50)
     */
    protected $name;
}

/**
 * @Entity
 */
class Employee extends Person
{
    /**
     * @Column(type="string", length=50)
     */
    private $department;
}

According to the doc, the Employee class can be queried this way:

SELECT e FROM Entities\Employee e WHERE e.name = 'test';

My question is: what if Person and Employee both had a name property, with different scopes and values? For example:

class Person {
    private $name;
}

class Employee extends Person {
    private $name;
}

My guess is that this query would be ran against Employee::$name:

SELECT e FROM Entities\Employee e WHERE e.name = 'test';

Would it be possible then, to query against Person::$name, while still returning only Employee instances? Something like:

SELECT e FROM Entities\Employee e WHERE e.parent.name = 'test';
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+100

With Doctrine you actually can have only one unique property name per hierarchy, which will be used in Entity, so overriding class properties in this way is not a good idea.

The only way to have different values in this example is to define different property names and database fields:

class Person
{
    // ...

    /**
     * @ORM\Column(type="string", length=50)
     */
    protected $name;
}

class Employee extends Person
{
    // ...

    /**
     * @ORM\Column(type="string", length=50, name="employeeName")
     */
    protected $employeeName;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that indeed makes sense for DQL that way! –  Benjamin Sep 1 '11 at 15:24
1  
For anyone interested, that is actually documented here: "Any two entity classes in a class hierarchy that inherit directly or indirectly from one another must not have a mapped property with the same name. That is, if B inherits from A then B must not have a mapped field with the same name as an already mapped field that is inherited from A." –  Benjamin Sep 9 '11 at 23:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.