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I'm trying to figure out how to implement multi-bundle integration test in OSGi using JUnit.

With integration test, I mean instantiating a subset of the bundles to automatically validate functionality in that subsystem.

We're running Equinox and using Eclipse as toolchain. Eclipse offers the "Run as JUnit Plug-in" option which brings the OSGi framework up and instantiates the configures bundles, so I guess this is the path to follow, but I don't find a way to inject DS references into my tests. I've seen the use of the ServiceTracker as a programmatic means to access the different service bundles, but that beats the purpose of having DS, isn't it?

I am just getting started with OSGI, so I figure I'm just missing some piece of the puzzle that would let me put my multi-bundle tests together.

Any ideas?

Thanks, Gerard.

* EDIT : SOLUTION *

After looking further into this issue, I finally figured out how to put this mult-bundle integration tests in place using the JUnit plug-in feature:

For the dynamic services injection to work, one must create a service definition file where the injected dependencies must be declared, as it's usually done when working with DS. This file goes (typically) under the OSGI-INF/ directory. e.g. OSGI-INF/service.xml

service.xml must declare the required dependencies for this test, but does not offer a service of its own:

service.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<scr:component xmlns:scr="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/scr/v1.1.0" immediate="true" name="MyTest" activate="startup" deactivate="shutdown">

   <implementation class="com.test.functionaltest.MyTester"/>
   <reference name="OtherService" interface="com.product.service.FooService" policy="static" cardinality="1..1" bind="onServiceUp" unbind="onServiceDown"/>

</scr:component>

This will instruct DS to inject the dependency on FooService using the declared onServiceUp method. onServiceDown must be implemented as it's called during the OSGi shutdown phase after the tests are run.

com.test.functionaltest.MyTester contains the test methods to be executed, following the typical JUnit practices.

Up to here, it's all 'by the book'. Yet, if the Junit is run, it will throw NullPointerException when accessing a reference to FooService. The reason for that is that the OSGi framework is in a race condition with the JUnit tests runner context, and usually, the Junit test runner wins that race, executing the tests before the reference to the required service is injected.

To solve this situation, it's required to make the Junit test to wait for the OSGi runtime to do its work. I addressed this issue by using a CountDownLatch, that is initialized to the number of dependent services required in the test. Then every dependency injection method counts down and when they are all done, the test will start. The code looks like this:

private static CountDownLatch dependencyLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);// 1 = number of dependencies required    
static FooService  fooService = null;   
public void onFooServiceUp(FooService service) {
  fooService = service;
  dependencyLatch.countDown();
}

Note that the fooService reference needs to be static to allow sharing the service reference between the OSGi and the JUnit execution contexts. The CountDownLatch provides a high-level synchronization mechanism for safe publication of this shared reference.

Then, a dependency check should be added before the test execution:

@Before
public void dependencyCheck() {
  // Wait for OSGi dependencies
    try {
      dependencyLatch.await(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS); 
      // Dependencies fulfilled
    } catch (InterruptedException ex)  {
      fail("OSGi dependencies unfulfilled");
    }
}

This way the Junit framework waits for the OSGi DS service to inject the dependencies or fails after the timeout.

It took me quite some time to completely figure this one out. I hope it saves some headache to fellow programmers in the future.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

* EDIT : SOLUTION *

After looking further into this issue, I finally figured out how to put this mult-bundle integration tests in place using the JUnit plug-in feature:

For the dynamic services injection to work, one must create a service definition file where the injected dependencies must be declared, as it's usually done when working with DS. This file goes (typically) under the OSGI-INF/ directory. e.g. OSGI-INF/service.xml

service.xml must declare the required dependencies for this test, but does not offer a service of its own:

service.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<scr:component xmlns:scr="http://www.osgi.org/xmlns/scr/v1.1.0" immediate="true" name="MyTest" activate="startup" deactivate="shutdown">

   <implementation class="com.test.functionaltest.MyTester"/>
   <reference name="OtherService" interface="com.product.service.FooService" policy="static" cardinality="1..1" bind="onServiceUp" unbind="onServiceDown"/>

</scr:component>

This will instruct DS to inject the dependency on FooService using the declared onServiceUp method. onServiceDown must be implemented as it's called during the OSGi shutdown phase after the tests are run.

com.test.functionaltest.MyTester contains the test methods to be executed, following the typical JUnit practices.

Up to here, it's all 'by the book'. Yet, if the Junit is run, it will throw NullPointerException when accessing a reference to FooService. The reason for that is that the OSGi framework is in a race condition with the JUnit tests runner context, and usually, the Junit test runner wins that race, executing the tests before the reference to the required service is injected.

To solve this situation, it's required to make the Junit test to wait for the OSGi runtime to do its work. I addressed this issue by using a CountDownLatch, that is initialized to the number of dependent services required in the test. Then every dependency injection method counts down and when they are all done, the test will start. The code looks like this:

private static CountDownLatch dependencyLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);// 1 = number of dependencies required    
static FooService  fooService = null;   
public void onFooServiceUp(FooService service) {
  fooService = service;
  dependencyLatch.countDown();
}

Note that the fooService reference needs to be static to allow sharing the service reference between the OSGi and the JUnit execution contexts. The CountDownLatch provides a high-level synchronization mechanism for safe publication of this shared reference.

Then, a dependency check should be added before the test execution:

@Before
public void dependencyCheck() {
  // Wait for OSGi dependencies
    try {
      dependencyLatch.await(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS); 
      // Dependencies fulfilled
    } catch (InterruptedException ex)  {
      fail("OSGi dependencies unfulfilled");
    }
}

This way the Junit framework waits for the OSGi DS service to inject the dependencies or fails after the timeout.

It took me quite some time to completely figure this one out. I hope it saves some headache to fellow programmers in the future.

share|improve this answer

You set it up using the tabs on the run configuration.

So right click, select "run as", select "run configurations...", double click "JUnit Plug-in Test", then add your dependencies on the plugins tab - pretty much the same as the normal launcher

Some links: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ratdevz/v8r0/index.jsp?topic=/org.eclipse.pde.doc.user/guide/tools/launchers/junit_launcher.htm and http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ratdevz/v8r0/index.jsp?topic=/org.eclipse.pde.doc.user/guide/tools/launchers/junit_main.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, that's the "run as JUnit plug-in" option I mentioned, but it doesn't seem to be sufficient for getting the Declarative Services injected. i.e. Where do you declare the binding methods? There's also the question on context. Will the injection happen on the Junit context? If so, how is that mechanism working? –  maasg Aug 24 '11 at 8:55
    
The same as you use DS in the application. You'll need add the DS bundle, this scans other bundles as they're loaded and manages the wiring. The DS bindings are declared in the component xml in OSGI-INF in the bundle's jar. See vogella.de/articles/OSGi/article.html#declarativeservices_run for an explanation of using DS in Eclipse Plugin projects. HTH –  earcam Aug 24 '11 at 10:13
    
Thanks for the suggestion. The DS injection methods are not getting called in the context of the Junit-plugin run. My OSG-INF correctly declares them. –  maasg Aug 26 '11 at 12:06
    
thanks for your suggestion. It required more than just configuration. I've updated my question with the solution I found. –  maasg Nov 8 '11 at 11:08
    
@maasg glad you got it sorted out and nice to see you posted your solution +1 –  earcam Nov 8 '11 at 11:16

I guess it would be a bit cleaner to get hold of the org.apache.felix.scr.ScrService and actively wait for the component to become ACTIVE. This interface is implemented by both equinox and felix.

Java doc and API Usage.

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I'm not familiar with the Eclipse tools that you mention, but we've been successfully using Pax Exam for integration testing in Apache Sling. If you are familiar with Maven, the POM at https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/sling/trunk/installer/it/pom.xml might help you in getting started, and https://github.com/tonit/Learn-PaxExam looks like a good starting point as well.

The Sling testing tools can also help in this context by allowing bundles to contribute JUnit tests to an OSGi framework at runtime, which is useful if your project generates a runnable jar that can be used for testing.

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