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So i have a base class:

public SomeClass{
    public string Id{ get; set; go; }
}

And then another class like so:

public class Invite<T>{
    public List<T> {get;set;}
}

and then some derived:

public BabyClass : SomeClass{
    public string Id{ get; set;}
    public void PooInNappy(){...}
}

public TeenagerClass : SomeClass{
    public string Id{ get; set; }
    public void ScreamIDidntAskToBeBorn(){...}
}

and i want to have a list like:

List<Invite<SomeClass>> familly = new List<Invite<SomeClass>>();
familly.Add(new Invite<TeenagerClass>());
familly.Add(new Invite<BabyClass>());

Get me?

cest possible?

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closed as not a real question by Jon Skeet, iwayneo, Grant Thomas, Russ C, Shamim Hafiz Aug 23 '11 at 19:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Have you tried this? The answer would be obvious if you just typed in your own code... –  mydogisbox Aug 23 '11 at 13:00
    
It looks like you have all of the information to try this theory of yours. –  hunter Aug 23 '11 at 13:01
    
loz - sorry i typed this in using the txt editor while trying to remember what the issues were - i have updated the question –  iwayneo Aug 23 '11 at 13:03
    
Your edit has radically changed the meaning of the question, rendering all the answers completely nonsensical. Please take more time to construct a sensible question the first time. –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:05
    
i cant help it if within 20 seconds loads of people thought they'd hurl abuse!! –  iwayneo Aug 23 '11 at 13:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have no idea what you are trying to do, but you need another layer of abstraction for it to work:

First some interfaces:

public interface IInvitable
{
    string Id { get; set; }
}

public interface IInvtier<T> where T : IInvitable
{
    List<T> What { get; set; }
}

Now some implementations:

public class Invite<T> : IInvtier<IInvitable> where T : IInvitable
{
    public List<IInvitable> What { get; set; } 
}

public class BabyClass : IInvitable
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
}

public class TeenagerClass : IInvitable
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
}

And finally, some working stuff:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var family = new List<IInvtier<IInvitable>>();
        family.Add(new Invite<TeenagerClass>());
        family.Add(new Invite<BabyClass>());
    }
}

But like I said, I have no idea what you are really asking, or if this is even a good idea.

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thanks dude - it was like a warzone here 30 mins ago... a nice sane, straightforward answer –  iwayneo Aug 23 '11 at 13:43

Yes this is entirely possible. Apart from the { get; set; go; } bit.

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1  
There is a recent edit that renders all the existing answers nonsensical; not your fault, but... –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:06

Only if there is an actual relationship there, i.e.

public SomeClass {
    public string Id { get; set; }
}

public BabyClass : SomeClass {
    public void PooInNappy(){...}
}

public TeenagerClass : SomeClass {
    public void ScreamIDidntAskToBeBorn(){...}
}

You could also use an interface instead of the base-class:

public ISomeInterface {
    string Id { get; set; }
}

public BabyClass : ISomeInterface {
    public string Id { get; set;}
    public void PooInNappy(){...}
}

public TeenagerClass : ISomeInterface {
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public void ScreamIDidntAskToBeBorn(){...}
}

(and a List<ISomeInterface>, obviously)

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Note: There is a recent edit that renders all the existing answers nonsensical –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:14

Your derived types aren't derivatives of anything yet, you need to inherit the base class:

public class BabyClass : SomeClass
{
    public void PooInNappy(){...}
}

public class TeenagerClass : SomeClass
{
    public void ScreamIDidntAskToBeBorn(){...}
}

Notice you can remove Id from these classes since it is exposed by the parent class.

I have absolutely no idea what the go; is supposed to be for, but it is invalid.

EDIT:

To bring this post into alignment with your updated question, I can only agree with Marc Gravell's second answer inasmuch that the implementation you tend to desire is not directly possible, you would need to significantly alter your approach, rendering this question redundant. The answer by 32bitkid might provide you with enough flexibility in your case, but again, as Marc mentions, you are stuck to working with the interfaces through accessing elements of the list.

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go was a joke... –  iwayneo Aug 23 '11 at 13:04
    
@iwayneo: Shhh! Don't mention the J word, we'll be lynched! ;) –  Grant Thomas Aug 23 '11 at 13:06
    
There is a recent edit that renders all the existing answers nonsensical; not your fault, but... –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:06
    
@Marc Gravell: Thanks for the heads up... perhaps it's a slippery slope. –  Grant Thomas Aug 23 '11 at 13:09
    
@iwayneo: Pardon? –  Grant Thomas Aug 23 '11 at 13:09

It certainly is possible. All you have to do is make sure that the Instantiating classes extends/implements the base class.

You can go the rough way of making a List of Object Class, but it's not so elegant.

So, derive from a common base class and you are good to go.

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There is a recent edit that renders all the existing answers nonsensical; not your fault, but... –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:07
1  
TOTALLY MY FAULT - LET ME COME ROUND YOUR HOUSE AND DO YOUR DISHES - SO SORRY - TOATALLY MY FAULT. DWEEB –  iwayneo Aug 23 '11 at 13:08
2  
@iwayneo the comment was added purely to help clarify to later readers why some of the answers (including mine) may be confusing when compared to the question –  Marc Gravell Aug 23 '11 at 13:14

With the edit that discusses Invite<T>.... no, that isn't possible. Simply.

It is not true that Invite<SomeDerived> : Invite<SomeBase>, so regular equivalence rules (of putting a Banana into a List<Fruit>, for example) do not apply; .NET 4.0 and C# 4.0 introduces more comprehensive variance via in and out, but this doesn't apply to lists (which are neither co- nor contra-variant), not to classes (only to certain interfaces and delegates).

So no; you cannot do that.

You would have to use Invite<BaseClass> even when talking about the teenager etc. Or significantly re-work the API.

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