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Imagine I have this:

PROJECT1 := /path/to/first
PROJECT2 := /path/to/second
PROJECT3 := /path/to/third

I am doing a find to collect all c,cpp,h files from inside them. I have something like:

PROJECT1_CPP := $(shell find $(PROJECT1) -name "*.cpp" -type "f")
PROJECT1_C := ... ( the same happens for PROJECT2 and PROJECT3 )

Now, I could add targets for each of them like:

project1.lib: $(PROJECT1_OBJS)
  ...

project2.lib: $(PROJECT2_OBJS)
  ...

project3.lib: $(PROJECT3_OBJS)
  ...

The thing with this approach is: there's a lot of repetitive-code ( all the actions for all the builds are almost the same ). I would like to be able to do something more generic, like:

PROJECTS := /path/to/first
PROJECTS += /path/to/second
PROJECTS += /path/to/third

And then somehow iterate through them and build them. Something like this pseudocode:

foreach project in PROJECTS
  gather C/C++ files
  build them
  link them

link everything together

Could you give me any pointers as to where I should start? Is this even possible in Make?

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1  
All of this can be done, but do you want to keep then the different projectX.lib? Or just one final.lib? –  Diego Sevilla Aug 23 '11 at 14:27
    
Different libs for now. I can combine them later into a single one. –  Tempus Aug 23 '11 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It can be done in GNUMake, I don't know about other varieties.

First we define a macro:

SOURCES = $(shell find $(1) -name "*.cpp" -type "f")

Then we can call it for each project:

PROJECT1_CPP := $(call SOURCES,$(PROJECT1))
PROJECT2_CPP := $(call SOURCES,$(PROJECT2))
PROJECT3_CPP := $(call SOURCES,$(PROJECT3))

Or if there are a lot of them (or we're lazy):

PROJECTS := PROJECT1 PROJECT2 PROJECT3
$(foreach proj,$(PROJECTS),$(eval $(proj)_CPP := $(call SOURCES,$($(proj)))))

Or if we're really lazy:

$(foreach proj,1 2 3,$(eval PROJECT$(proj)_CPP := $(call SOURCES,$(PROJECT$(proj)))))

Now to build them, instead of this:

project1.lib: $(PROJECT1_OBJS)
  do something with $(PROJECT1_OBJS)

project2.lib: $(PROJECT2_OBJS)
  do something with $(PROJECT2_OBJS)

project3.lib: $(PROJECT3_OBJS)
  do something with $(PROJECT3_OBJS)

we change to this:

project1.lib: $(PROJECT1_OBJS)
  do something with $^

project2.lib: $(PROJECT2_OBJS)
  do something with $^

project3.lib: $(PROJECT3_OBJS)
  do something with $^

And then to this:

project1.lib: $(PROJECT1_OBJS)

project2.lib: $(PROJECT2_OBJS)

project3.lib: $(PROJECT3_OBJS)

project1.lib project2.lib project3.lib
  do something with $^

We could even turn that into another $(foreach ... $(eval...)), but let's not go overboard.

EDIT:
You want overboard? Over you go:

PROJECT1 := /path/to/first
PROJECT2 := /path/to/second
PROJECT3 := /path/to/third    

all:
        @echo linking $^ somehow

define all_rules
  PROJECT$(1)_CPP := $(shell find $(PROJECT$(1)) -name "*.cpp" -type "f")

  project$(1).lib: $(PROJECT$(1)_CPP:.cpp=.o)
      @echo making $$@ from $$^

  all: project$(1).lib
endef                                                                              

$(foreach proj,1 2 3,$(eval $(call all_rules,$(proj))))

%.o: %.cpp
    @echo making $@ from $<
share|improve this answer
    
Overboard seems to be exactly what I need :) –  Tempus Aug 23 '11 at 15:26

You can use macros (define) in GNU make and eval to add rules on the fly. It is not easy, but it works. The following code assumes that the name of the project is the name of the directory where the project resides:

PROJECTS := /path/to/project1 /path/to/project2

all:
    # Do all libraries


define def_rules
 v=$$(notdir $(1))
 $$(v)_CPP := $$(shell find $(1) -name "*.cpp" -type "f")
 $$(v)_OBJS := $$(patsubst %.cpp,%.o,$$($$(v)_CPP))
 $$(v).lib: $$($$(v)_OBJS)
    lib ... $$<
endef

$(foreach pr,$(PROJECTS),$(eval $(call def_rules,$(pr))))
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I'd write a script to generate the makefiles for each project, execute make on each and delete them if all went well

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