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I have run into a peculiar error in a C++ project at work.

I have found a fix, but I am now really satisfied, as I would like to understand what actually causes the error.

When building this snippet of code:

#include <iostream>
#include "snmp/snmp/SW_SNMP_Values.hpp"
#include "snmp/agent/SW_Agent.hpp"
#include "snmp/agent/SW_Agent_PP.hpp"

int main()
{
    //SW_Agent_PP agent;

    return 0;
}

Notice that SW_Agent_PP is COMMENTED OUT!! When building this, I get a ton of undefined reference errors, for classes that are in use by the SW_Agent_PP object.

The FIX is to ACTUALLY CREATE THE OBJECT! so if I do this:

#include <iostream>
#include "snmp/snmp/SW_SNMP_Values.hpp"
#include "snmp/agent/SW_Agent.hpp"
#include "snmp/agent/SW_Agent_PP.hpp"

int main()
{
    SW_Agent_PP agent;

    return 0;
}

everything works fine and dandy.

How can I get linker errors for NOT using something? I would like to hear if anyone have run into similar experiences before, and if they found what caused it.

I am sorry, but I cannot release more code as it is company property. Many thanks in advance!

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1  
What's the definition of SW_Agent_PP? Is is a macro? –  Kerrek SB Aug 23 '11 at 14:26
    
Sounds like a bug in one of the .hpp files. possibly a missing semicolon. –  Eran Zimmerman Aug 23 '11 at 14:26
    
complete class. Split into header and .cpp file –  Daniel Aug 23 '11 at 14:26
4  
If you can't give us your actual code, then construct an equivalent test case that still exhibits the problem, and then post the code for that. If we can't see your code, then how can we possibly help? –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 23 '11 at 14:27
1  
@Daniel I wouldn't call what you've done a fix but a temporary workaround. I would feel very uneasy continuing to use this code without knowing why it acts so strangely. Often these issues point to deeper issues that can really cost you later down the road. Better to get to the bottom of it now. –  Doug T. Aug 23 '11 at 14:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Linkers are complicated and this behaviour is by no means unusual. Here's one possible explanation:

  1. You are linking with a static library libfoo.a.
  2. libfoo.a contains foo.o that contains SW_Agent_PP::SW_Agent_PP() and a bunch of other functions.
  3. Another library libbar.a, listed after libfoo.a in the link line, uses a bunch of other functions from libfoo.a.

The linker processes static libraries in order and never goes back. Therefore the references in libbar.a can be only satisfied if corresponding object was pulled from libfoo.a by main().

The solution is to reorder the libraries in the link line.

There are other possible explanations. It's hard to tell without seeing actual code.

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