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I have a Data<TData, TKey> class that basically wraps around a dictionary. I want to have a constructor that can take another Data class, copy the values, and take a new key.

C# generics seem to prevent me from doing this however, because the Data class does not have to have the same type of key. All I care about is copying the values and then using a new key for a dictionary.

public class Data<TData, TKey>
{
    private Dictionary<TKey, List<TData>> keyedData;
    public delegate TKey Key(TData row);

    public Data(Data<T,K> data, Key keyDelegate, string keyName)
            : this(data.Values, keyDelegate, keyName)
    {   
    }
}

The Data<T,K> will not work, of course. If the constructor takes Data<TData, TKey>, though, it forces both the passed in class and the new class to have the same type key. They likely will not have the same type key. There should be a way to pass in Data<TData,?> as one would in Java.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps something like...

public interface IData<TData>
{
    IEnumerable<TData> Values { get; }
}

public class Data<TData, TKey> : IData<TData>
{
    private Dictionary<TKey, List<TData>> keyedData;
    public delegate TKey Key(TData row);

    public Data(IData<TData> data, Key keyDelegate, string keyName)
            : this(data.Values, keyDelegate, keyName)
    {
        //...
    }
}

Alternatively, you could make a true generic method to deal with it.

public class Data<TData, TKey>
{
    //...

    public void Populate<TOtherKey>(Data<TData, TOtherKey> otherData)
    {
        // copy otherData.Values into my values
    }
}

Then the consumer would do something like:

Data<DataType, Key1> data1 = new Data<DataType, Key2>(/*blah blah*/);
Data<DataType, Key2> data2 = new Data<DataType, Key2>(/*blah blah*/).Populate(data1);
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Okay that looks good. I wonder if that's really the best we can do? –  Ben B. Aug 23 '11 at 14:42
    
I like this, simple and elegant! You could also take an IEnumerable<TData> data as the first argument and pass directly on to the other constructor. That way you could build your Data from a List<TData>, TData[], Dictionary<TKey, TData>.Values, etc... –  James Michael Hare Aug 23 '11 at 14:44
    
@Ben B: Unfortunately, I think it is. Generic type constructors aren't allowed to introduce a new generic type placeholder from what I can tell. Typically, in this case we would just pass in an IEnumerable<TData> if you want the caller to decide on the sourcing method, or pass in a custom interface as BishopRook suggests if you want to hide that from the caller. –  James Michael Hare Aug 23 '11 at 14:47
1  
@Ben B: you could alternatively use a static method, which can take additional, or different, type parameters. The static method would do the work of the constructor. –  siride Aug 23 '11 at 14:51
    
I agree with @siride. A static Factory method gives you a lot more flexibility. Public constructors aren't the only way to make instances. –  Rick Goldstein Aug 23 '11 at 16:52

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