Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an application in WPF that is to be used exclusively by the keyboard, so we are really picky about focus behavior.

So, we get a PreviewLostKeyboardFocus on a textbox. Under certain circumstances we disable the next 5 fields and want the focus to go to the field after that. One might assume that the focus would do that, finding the next focusable field, this is what happens if I didn't disable the fields in the preview event. It doesn't, it keeps the focus on the first textbox.

I've tried forcing the focus with Keyboard.Focus(uielement) but nothing happens. It seems that the next focus target is already commited.

How can I make this happen, or am I "doing it wrong"? I am not in a position to change the requirement that specifies this behavior; I know that it is somewhat strange.

Thanks.

Edit: here is a small app that shows this behavior. XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication4.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"
    FocusManager.FocusedElement="{Binding ElementName=textBox0}"
    >
  <StackPanel>
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="5" Name="textBox0" Width="120" />
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="5" Name="textBox1" Width="120" PreviewLostKeyboardFocus="textBox1_PreviewLostKeyboardFocus"/>
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="5" Name="textBox2" Width="120" />
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="5" Name="textBox3" Width="120" />
    <TextBox Height="23" Margin="5" Name="textBox4" Width="120" />
  </StackPanel>
</Window>

Codebehind:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Input;

namespace WpfApplication4 {
    public partial class MainWindow : Window {
        public MainWindow() {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
        private void textBox1_PreviewLostKeyboardFocus(object sender, KeyboardFocusChangedEventArgs e) {
            textBox2.IsEnabled = false;
            textBox3.IsEnabled = false;
        }
    }
}

An obvious thing to try (at least for me) was to put Keyboard.focus(textBox4); in the PreviewLostKeyboardFocus event handler. It of course didn't work, it causes a loop that fires the PreviewLostKeyboardFocus event again....

Yet another edit: I've found that using breakpoints in textBox1_PreviewLostKeyboardFocus() will sometimes cause it to behave, or sometimes not even disable the 2nd and 3rd text boxes. I'm thinking of a race/threading problem.

share|improve this question
1  
You're not doing it wrong, wpf is bad for focus management, check joshsmithonwpf.wordpress.com/2010/03/16/… , you might find a way to solve your issue. –  Matthieu Aug 23 '11 at 15:22
    
There is an elegant solution to this, will have to reply tomorrow with the answer as I do not have the code available to me now. Until then... –  Dennis Aug 23 '11 at 23:18
1  
I'm excited to see what you've come up with. Thanks. –  Jeff Walker Aug 24 '11 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am not sure what exactly is causing this behavior but from past experience the WPF focus system is extremely unreliable after changing the controls in any way or when setting focus manually.

However, using a Dispatcher to perform focus changes after WPF caught up with the changes to the controls, often solves the problem.

This works fine in my testing

private void textBox1_PreviewLostKeyboardFocus(object sender, KeyboardFocusChangedEventArgs e) {
    textBox2.IsEnabled = false;
    textBox3.IsEnabled = false;

    this.Dispatcher
        .BeginInvoke(new Action(() => Keyboard.Focus(textBox4)), 
        System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Input, null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This smells pretty good. It will take me a few days to get back to this problem. I will have to see if it solves my problem in the larger scope of the shambles that is our project. Until then.... –  Jeff Walker Sep 1 '11 at 14:34

You might be able to do this better via the viewmodel. Your view model could set bool properties to enable/disable fields. I"m sure you'd rather not flood a viewmodel like that, but it may make the app behavior more predicable. I think wpf knows to skip tabstops on disabled controls, and you may be able to find a desired tab behavior in the tab navigation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.