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I'm curious what is the 'proper' pythonic way of handling this error with a while loop. I could simply check the string to see if it has a [-1] character beforehand in this example, but the actual code this example of my problem is based on is much more complicated.

try:
    while mystring[-1] == '!' #Will throw an error if mystring is a blank string
         print("Exclamation!")
         mystring = mystring[:-1]
    return mystring
except:
    return ""

Effectively my problem is that my while loop is contingent on a check that, occasionally after some processing within the loop, will throw an error. The above is just a (perhaps overly) simplified illustration of that problem. I fixed it with a series of try: excepts:'s, but I feel like that's not the "correct" way to be addressing this issue.

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What are you trying to do here? What error are you having a problem with? –  murgatroid99 Aug 23 '11 at 15:29
    
Effectively my problem is that my while loop is contingent on a check that, occasionally after some processing within the loop, will throw an error. –  Matthew Ark Aug 23 '11 at 15:31
2  
try/excepts is in fact a very pythonic way to handle such exceptions (easier to ask for forgiveness than permission, docs.python.org/glossary.html#term-eafp) –  Jdog Aug 23 '11 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two things your current code does that you shouldn't do:

  1. Catches any exception, you should catch just the specific exception of interest
  2. Includes the whole loop in the try block, you should if at all possible only include that statement/expression that raises the exception

If you find yourself using while loops a lot in python, it suggests that you aren't making the most effective use of python. Given python's toolset you should almost always be using some sort of for loop. Without seeing a real sample of your code, I can't say whether that's actually true. If you want help in that area, post some code at http://codereview.stackexchange.com

A general solution to this problem is to write a function which handles the exception and use that.

def last_character(string):
    try:
       return string[-1]
    except IndexError:
       return ' '

while last_character(mystring) == '!'
    mystring = mystring[:-1]
return mystring

In fact, in many cases already have exception-less equivalents to the standard constructs. This loop can easily be written using the .endswith() method. By using those or crafting your own you can deal with the exceptions most cleanly.

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For your example, you could simply do something like:

while mystring and mystring[-1] == '!':
    print("Exclamation!")
    mystring = mystring[:-1]
return mystring

This will work because it will short-circuit and end the loop if mystring is empty, so you will never try to access the -1 index of an empty string

Edit: As Winston pointed out, you can get rid of all of the special casing by using str.endswith as in the following code

while mystring.endswith('!'):
    print("Exclamation!")
    mystring = mystring[:-1]
return mystring
share|improve this answer
    
You could also decrement a counter for the location to test, then just return a copy once at the end, instead of making a copy of the string on every iteration. –  agf Aug 23 '11 at 15:40
1  
@agf That's true, but the OP's question seemed to be more about dealing with special cases in while loops than with his particular problem. –  murgatroid99 Aug 23 '11 at 15:42
3  
Using mystring.endswith is even better –  Winston Ewert Aug 23 '11 at 15:48
    
@Winston You're right. I added that option to my answer. –  murgatroid99 Aug 23 '11 at 16:00
    
I think the OP is actually asking for a general solution, not just his example here –  Winston Ewert Aug 23 '11 at 18:21

Use mystring.rstrip('!') to remove the'!' characters at the end of the string ;-)

If the problem is much more complicated, the proper way is to catch the IndexError thrown by the operation.

try:
    while mystring[-1] == '!' #Will through an error if mystring is a blank string
         print("Exclamation!")
         mystring = mystring[:-1]
    return mystring
except IndexError:
    return ""

Another way is to check the string for emptyness and avoiding using the operation which raises the exception:

while mystring and mystring[-1] == '!': # lazy boolean expression evaluation
      mystring = mystring[:-1]
return mystring

Other version without the lazy boolean expression evaluation:

if not mystring:
    return mystring
while mystring[-1] == '!':
    mystring = mystring[:-1]
    if not mystring:
        break
return mystring

I personnaly favor the second version, especially if you change mystring[-1] == '!' with mystring.endswith('!') (but in that case you don't need to check for emptyness, because endswith already does this for you).

share|improve this answer
    
That wasn't his question. –  agf Aug 23 '11 at 15:32
    
Editing my question to be a tad clearer. –  Matthew Ark Aug 23 '11 at 15:33
    
Will the second method do the "mystring[-1] == '!'" check if the first ("mystring") check fails? Or does it simply stop as soon as the first one in 'order' fails? –  Matthew Ark Aug 23 '11 at 15:35
    
the part after the "and" is not evaluated if the first term of the condition is False, so this solved your problem. –  gurney alex Aug 23 '11 at 15:37
    
@Matthew I added that explanation to my answer. –  murgatroid99 Aug 23 '11 at 15:37

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