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I am getting my feet wet with DDD (in .Net) for the first time, as I am re-architecting some core components of a legacy enterprise application.

Something I want to clear up is, how do we impliment persistance in a proper DDD architecture?

I realize that the domains themselves are persistance ignorant, and should be designed using the "ubiquitous language" and certainly not forced into the contraints of the DAC of the month or even the physical database.

Am I correct that the Repository Interfaces live within the Domain assembly, but the Respository Implimentations exist within the persistance layer? The persistance layer contains a reference to the Domain layer, never vice versa?

Where are my actual repository methods (CRUD) being called from?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Am I correct that the Repository Interfaces live within the Domain assembly, but the Respository Implimentations exist within the persistance layer? The persistance layer contains a reference to the Domain layer, never vice versa?

Yes, this is a very good approach.

Where are my actual repository methods (CRUD) being called from?

It might be a good idea to not think in CRUD terms because it is too data-centric and may lead you into Generic Repository Trap. Repository helps to manage middle and the end of life for domain objects. Factories are often responsible for beginning. Keep in mind that when the object is restored from the database it is in its midlife stage from DDD perspective. This is how the code can look like:

// beginning 
Customer preferredCustomer = CustomerFactory.CreatePreferred();
customersRepository.Add(preferredCustomer);

// middle life
IList<Customer> valuedCustomers = customersRepository.FindPrefered();

// end life
customersRepository.Archive(customer);

You can call this code directly from you application. It maybe worth downloading and looking at Evan's DDD Sample. Unit of Work pattern is usually employed to deal with transactions and abstracting your ORM of choice.

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I agree with everything Dmitry has said here, the only thing I'd add for clarity is that I'd recommend your client/UI project references an 'Application Services' layer, that invokes methods on the domain (either domain aggregates or domain services) and calls the repositories from here. This way all logic is contained within this application service, and you can change / add user interfaces with little effort. –  David Masters Aug 24 '11 at 8:11
    
I would only add a service layer when it has clear benefits for the application, not just for the sake of it. A service layer is an extra layer of abstraction which in many cases you can do without. –  Robin van der Knaap Aug 25 '11 at 23:53

Check out what Steve Bohlen has to say on the subject. The code for the presentation can be found here.

I was at the presentation and found the information on how to model repositories good.

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Very nice, definitely the most straight forward introduction to DDD I've seen. The code is nice because it isn't bogged down with fancy plumbing like many of the other examples out there. Unfortunately it is a little light on the actual implimentation side of things, which I was really trying to get help on. –  EkoostikMartin Aug 23 '11 at 18:54

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