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I have an array. The valid values are not zero (either positive or negetive). I want to find the minimum and maximum within the array which should not take zeros in accout. For example if the number are only negetive. zeros will be probelmatic.

Thanks

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2  
What is your question? What have you tried? How didn't it work? –  Henning Makholm Aug 23 '11 at 16:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

How about:

import numpy as np
minval = np.min(a[np.nonzero(a)])
maxval = np.max(a[np.nonzero(a)])

where a is your array.

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+1 for using numpy –  rubik Aug 23 '11 at 16:39
1  
+1 also will take some minutes to accept the answer –  Shan Aug 23 '11 at 16:41
    
@Shan: Using masked arrays can avoid the copy created by a[np.nonzero(a)] -- see my answer. –  Sven Marnach Aug 23 '11 at 16:58

If you can choose the "invalid" value in your array, it is better to use nan instead of 0:

>>> a = numpy.array([1.0, numpy.nan, 2.0])
>>> numpy.nanmax(a)
2.0
>>> numpy.nanmin(a)
1.0

If this is not possible, you can use an array mask:

>>> a = numpy.array([1.0, 0.0, 2.0])
>>> ma = numpy.ma.masked_equal(a, 0.0, copy=False)
>>> ma.max()
2.0
>>> ma.min()
1.0

Compared to Josh's answer using advanced indexing, this has the advantage of avoiding to create a copy of the array.

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what is this ma... is not it another copy? –  Shan Aug 23 '11 at 17:02
    
+1 Masked arrays are another nice (and often under utilized) solution –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 17:05
2  
@Sven: when I do ma.base is a I get false, so it doesn't look like ma is just a view of a and there is a copy of the memory somewhere. Or am I testing this the wrong way? –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 17:12
    
+1 from my side as well –  Shan Aug 23 '11 at 17:21
1  
@JoshAdel: by default, np.ma.masked_equal makes a copy of a. To get a view, use ma = np.ma.masked_equal(a, 0.0, copy=False). –  unutbu Aug 26 '11 at 13:14

A simple way would be to use a list comprehension to exclude zeros.

>>> tup = (0, 1, 2, 5, 2)
>>> min([x for x in tup if x !=0])
1
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OP is looking for a solution for numpy arrays, not python tuples. As in the other comment, I'm not going to downvote, but this is not relevant to numpy arrays. –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 16:40
    
The title of the question does say "in a numpy array (or a tuple)". –  Wilduck Aug 23 '11 at 16:41
    
didn't see tuple in the title and only read the question which says array. I stand corrected +1. I jumped on you (and the other response), because people post solutions to numpy questions treating them as if they are numpy lists, which they aren't. It's a personal pet peeve, since the numpy solution is often wildly more efficient. –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 16:44
    
slight correction of what I wrote above: '....treating them as if they are python lists...' –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 16:56

You could use a generator expression to filter out the zeros:

array = [-2, 0, -4, 0, -3, -2]
max(x for x in array if x != 0)
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1  
I think the OP is talking about numpy arrays and not python lists. There is a difference, although your solution is correct for the later. Not going to downvote, but just so you know. –  JoshAdel Aug 23 '11 at 16:39
    
Ahh, just saw array, didn't see the numpy tag. –  Chris Pickett Aug 23 '11 at 16:54

Here's another way of masking which I think is easier to remember (although it does copy the array). For the case in point, it goes like this:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.array([1.0, 0.0, 2.0])
>>> ma = a[a != 0]
>>> ma.max()
2.0
>>> ma.min()
1.0
>>> 

It generalizes to other expressions such as a > 0, numpy.isnan(a), ... And you can combine masks with standard operators (+ means OR, * means AND, - means NOT) e.g:

# Identify elements that are outside interpolation domain or NaN
outside = (xi < x[0]) + (eta < y[0]) + (xi > x[-1]) + (eta > y[-1])
outside += numpy.isnan(xi) + numpy.isnan(eta)
inside = -outside
xi = xi[inside]
eta = eta[inside]
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