Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which would you consider more efficient?

The use of 'WeekDay' is just an example:

public enum WeekDay {
    MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY;
}

Loop through and verify day string first:

public void parseString(String line) {
    String[] tokens = line.split();
    String day = tokens[1]; // day 'should' always be a weekday
    if (isValidWeekDay(day)) {
        WeekDay weekDay = WeekDay.valueOf(day); // won't throw exception
        ...
    } else {
        throw new InvalidWeekDayException(day); // subclass of RuntimeException
    }
}
private boolean isValidWeekDay(String day) {
    for (WeekDay weekDay : WeekDay.values()) {
        if(weekDay.toString().equals(day))
           return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Or since in 99.99% of cases, day will be correct:

public void parseString(String line) {
    String[] tokens = line.split();
    String day = tokens[1]; // day 'should' always be a weekday
    try {
        WeekDay weekDay = WeekDay.valueOf(day); // might throw exception
        ...
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
        throw new InvalidWeekDayException(day, e);
    }
}

Update:

To clarify, the input string will come from a client application, rather than a user. So in other words, it would be a bug to recieve a non workday in this example.

share|improve this question
7  
It may sound like a facetious answer, but I would consider the one that ran fastest when I profiled it to be the most efficient. –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 23 '11 at 17:15
    
Is the String coming from something a user enters, or is it all coming from internally? –  DHall Aug 23 '11 at 17:16
    
I'd use this instead, if you really are doing an enum of days of week : joda-time.sourceforge.net/field.html#dayOfWeek –  NimChimpsky Aug 23 '11 at 17:20
3  
Why catch the IllegalArgumentException at all, if it's a programming error? IllegalArgumentException is exactly what I would expect if I asked a utility method to parse illegal data that I passed in. –  Mark Peters Aug 23 '11 at 17:25
1  
@NimChimpsky the manual loop and valueOf are not equivalent. Hence my question. –  toolkit Aug 23 '11 at 17:35
show 6 more comments

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What is the performance concern about the 2nd approach? Catching an exception like that costs almost nothing. Using exceptions for normal control flow is generally a bad idea from a design perspective, the days where this was a performance consideration are long gone. In a debugger, using exceptions as significant control operations will slow things down by a factor of about 10. But this gets optimized by the JIT and there is no measurable impact in production.

These numbers are based on experience with an evaluation I did of the zxing project, which uses exceptions for all sorts of flow control. When I first saw it, I was horrified. I still think it's not the best design, but I did quite a bit of testing and can say with a good bit of confidence that it had no real impact on performance. And this is an algorithm that was using exceptions all over the place for flow control. Your situation, where the exception will only get thrown in highly exceptional circumstances, is a non issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the advice Kevin. –  toolkit Aug 23 '11 at 17:55
add comment

Store the valid strings in a HashSet, and decide whether a string is a valid day or not based on Set.contains(...).

The set can be a static final Set, and you can wrap in an unmodifiable for good measure:

private static final Map<String> WEEKDAY_STRINGS;
static {
  HashSet<String> set = new HashSet();
  for (WeekDay d : WeekDay.values()) {
    set.add(d.toString());
  }
  WEEKDAY_STRINGS = Collections.unmodifiableSet(set);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this is overcomplicating the problem imho –  NimChimpsky Aug 23 '11 at 17:33
add comment

The loop doesn't do anything that calling valueof doesn't, they have the same functionality : checking whether your string is valid enum. What do you think you gain from the first option ?

The second option is best:

 try {
     WeekDay weekDay = WeekDay.valueOf(day); // might throw exception
        ...
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
        throw new InvalidWeekDayException(day);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I guess its all down to how common invalid days are. If 50% of days were invalid, then some would consider it very inefficient to throw/catch an exception. However if its only the rare client application bug, then this is definitely the way to go. –  toolkit Aug 23 '11 at 17:39
add comment

Or you could create a lookup of enum values inside your enum when the class first loads(see static modifier) and validate using get() as shown below:

private String dayName;
private static final Map<String,Weekday> lookup = new HashMap<String, Weekday>();
static{
    for (Weekday day: values()){
        lookup.put(day.dayName, d);
    }
}
public static Weekday get(String _name){
    return lookup.get(_name);
}

Let me know if you need more details

share|improve this answer
add comment

As has been commented, you will have to profile to find out for sure. Even in your own parsing approach, you can make it faster by returning the enum when you parse the list.

private boolean getValidWeekDay(String day) {
    for (WeekDay weekDay : WeekDay.values()) {
        if(weekDay.toString().equals(day))
           return weekDay;
    }
    return null;
}

Unless this is a time critical piece of an application, I wouldn't worry about it in either case and simply take the most readable approach. I think that would be using the WeekDay.valueOf() method.

If you would rather not have to deal with exceptions, then create a Map of your values within the enum and effectively do the equivalent of valueOf() from a lookup which returns null if it is not found.

public enum WeekDay {
    MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY;

    private static Map<String, WeekDay> valueMap;

    public static WeekDay getValue(String possibleName)
    {
        if (valueMap == null)
        {
            valueMap = new HashMap<String, WeekDay>();
            for(WeedDay day: values())
                valueMap.put(day.toString(), day);
        }
        return valueMap.get(possibleName);

    }
 }

This is effectively what the valueOf() method is doing anyway, except it throws the IllegalArgumentException when it is not found. This approach will simply return null, thus not generating the stacktrace.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If your question is really about the efficiency of searching among 7 item you have already wasted too much time on it. Even the fastest search algorithms yield zero or negative benefits until N > 15 or so, other than the O(1) one.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.