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Simplification of the code to express the concept:

class classA
{

public:

private:
   int a;
   seta(int x);
};

//local prototype
void somefunction();

int main()
{
  classA object; //create an object of the class

  somefunction(object);
  return 0;
}

void somefunction(classA &object)
{

  object.seta(5);    
}

}

If I move seta() to the public section of the class there is no error and it executes.

However, if I move seta() to the private section, I get the following error:

error C2248: 'anonymous-namespace'::classA::seta' : cannot access private member declared in class 'anonymous-namespace'::classA'

If the function is private and only this class is calling it, why is there an issue?

EDIT I am passing the object from main to the local function

share|improve this question
    
Your comment in main is wrong - you're creating an instance of a class (which is an object), not creating a class. – razlebe Aug 23 '11 at 17:51
    
void main() should be int main(). – Keith Thompson Aug 23 '11 at 17:52
    
You obviously have a misunderstanding of what private means. The example you quote is clearly illegal, and I struggling to imagine why you think it should be OK. Perhaps you need to explain your reasoning if you want to gain some understanding. Or just make somefunction a friend of of classA if you want to call private methods from it. – john Aug 23 '11 at 17:54
    
@razlebe: fixed – T.T.T. Aug 23 '11 at 17:55
2  
@Tommy: People have a lot of misunderstandings about public and private, usually because they misunderstand the purpose. The point of public and private is to seperate the interface of a class (broadly speaking it's public members) from it's implementation so that the implementation can change without the code using the class also having to change. – john Aug 23 '11 at 18:04
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The function that is calling seta() is not part of classA, so this is an error; that's the very definition of private. If you were to make somefunction() a member of classA, or declare it to be a friend of classA, then this would work.

share|improve this answer
    
very clear thank you. – T.T.T. Aug 23 '11 at 18:09

The function somefunction() is not a member function of classA. It's a function with global scope and cannot access the private function seta(), just as main() cannot access the private function seta().

share|improve this answer

This has nothing to do with "local functions" (functions defined inside other functions). This is simply about public and private members.

If a member is private, then it can only be accessed by other members of that class, or by explicit friends of the class.

share|improve this answer

private means that only member functions and friends can access it. Both must be listed in the class declaration, but are not:

class classA
{

public:

private:
   int a;
   seta(int x);
};

Being in the same file doesn't make the function a part of the class -- only the class declaration is used to determine what has access.

share|improve this answer

Private members can only be accessed by it's members and it's friends. Also every member function in C++, should have a return type. With that said -

void main() // 1
{
  classA object; //2

  somefunction();
}
  1. Return type of main should be int.
  2. Scope of object is only in main and cannot be accessed in somefunction with out explicitly passing it to the function.

On your Edit:

You are passing object to somefunction(classA) by value. So, a copy of the object ( main scoped) is made to somefunction scoped object. Though they bear the same name, both are different.

void somefunction(classA object)
{                    // ^^^^^^   Is a copy of the parameter passed. 
   object.seta(5); // This call isn't actually modifying the original parameter passed.

}// life time of argument,object, ends here. 

You should pass it by reference instead if you wish to modify parameter passed itself.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, reference is what I need, thank you. – T.T.T. Aug 23 '11 at 18:21

Firstly, to answer your primary question:

If the function is private and only this class is calling it, why is there an issue?

The issue is that private class members can only be invoked by other members of that class. The function somefunction() is not a member of classA and therefore does not have access to private member seta().

As an aside, you should also think carefully about what you're doing when passing object to somefunction() from main. You're passing object by value, so you're creating a copy of object scoped to somefunction() which will be destroyed as soon as somefunction() terminates. IS that what you want?

I suspect that you're intending to pass object to somefunction() from main by reference, in which case you need to declare somefunction() as

void somefunction(classA &object)
share|improve this answer
    
yes, it should be by reference, thank you. – T.T.T. Aug 23 '11 at 18:09

seta(int x) is a private member of ClassA, so only ClassA or a friend class of ClassA can access to this member. somefunction() is none of them.

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