Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Scenario 1: Code:

int main(){
    int a = 12345678;

    if(isdigit(a)){
        printf("ok: foo\n");
    }
    else{
        printf("false: bar\n");
    }
    printf("test\n");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output:

Segmentation fault

Scenario 2: Code:

 ...
    if(isdigit(a)){
        //printf("ok: foo\n");
    }
    else{
        //printf("false: bar\n");
    }
    printf("test\n");
 ...

Output:

test

and now the last, Code:

...
int a = 1234567;
...

Output:

ok: foo
test

What's wrong with isdigit()? I do not understand!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Probably because the compiler optimizes the isdigit function call from the code. That is it doesn't run it.

Also note that isdigit expects a character, not a number. http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cctype/isdigit/

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh...ok. Now runs without segmentation fault :) –  krzym Aug 23 '11 at 18:11

This is because isdigit can be defined as macro like this

#define isdigit(c) ((map[c] & FLAG_DIGIT)==FLAG_DIGIT)

You call isdigit with integer value, but map array size is 256 elements. In this case you try to read value outside of array bounds -> segmentation fault. This segmentation fault can occurs randomly. Depending on your program or data size.

share|improve this answer

This was probably optimized by the compiler. As neither the if or the else does something, it was removed and the isdigit ends up not called. Be sure to

#include <ctype.h>

The segmentation fault is coming probably from the fact that you're passing a (not so small) number, when a character was expected. When you remove the printf statements and the compiler optimizes it, the call won't happen thus not failing.

Note that the headers can be in fact omitted since the program will be linked with the standard C library by default, so it works. But it's not a good idea, and you should see a warning at least.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't forget #include <ctype.h> :) I can compile this mini program without errors. –  krzym Aug 23 '11 at 18:07
    
@krzym Ah, ok. I edited the answer with a bit more info. –  sidyll Aug 23 '11 at 18:11
    
@krzym: I can't. Some compilers are a little more finicky than others, but <ctype.h> should be included. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 23 '11 at 18:17

First of all, isdigit(3) checks whether a character is a digit.

The segmentation fault probably (I'm positive) happens because you haven't included stdio.h.

Then you're calling printf which uses variable arguments without knowing its prototype (undefined behavior).

share|improve this answer
    
The crash isn't because of lack of any include files. Also I don't understand your last point. The C compiler/linker would have reported an error if it couldn't find the function. –  user357320 Aug 23 '11 at 19:33
    
@user357320, No, it wouldn't have. Maybe a warning, if configured correctly, and it's not about the function's definition, it's about its declaration. –  Bertrand Marron Aug 24 '11 at 8:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.