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Following is my method that might raise the exception.

Its a method of the CLI too that I am building.

Whenever the exception occurs, I want to catch that and just print my custom message on the terminal.

# variation 1
def self.validate(yaml_path)
  begin
    ....
    ....
  rescue
    puts "Error"
  end
end

# variation 2
def self.validate(yaml_path)
  begin
    ....
    ....
  rescue Exceptino => e
    puts "Error: #{e.message}"
  end
end

But the backtrace gets printed on the terminal.

How to avoid the backtrace to get printed?

± ../../bin/cf site create                                                                                                                                                                          

ruby-1.8.7-p352
Error during processing: syntax error on line 52, col 10: `          - label: Price'
/Users/millisami/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.8.7-p352/lib/ruby/1.8/yaml.rb:133:in `load': syntax error on line 52, col 10: `          - label: Price' (ArgumentError)
.... backtrace .....
.............
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3 Answers 3

The following code doesn't output the backtrace.

class CLS
  def hi
    begin
      raise "X"
    rescue
      puts $!.message
    end
  end
end

CLS.new.hi

Have you checked to see if there is another point in the stack where another method is rescuing the exception, outputting the stack trace and then re-raising the exception?

share|improve this answer
    
Though I put puts $!.message, the stacktrace is still printing. And I couldn't find any thing that is re-raising the error in my code. But I think since I'm using the thor library, it might be the one that is reraising error. Here is the gist gist.github.com/1167353 of the full stacktrace. Can you look at it which exception should I rescue, if its due to thor? –  Millisami Aug 24 '11 at 5:17
    
sorry, I'm not familiar with thor –  Brian Glick Aug 24 '11 at 16:35

The reason you're not rescuing the exception is because Psych::SyntaxError is not descended from StandardError, so a simple rescue won't catch it. You need to specify a descendant of Psych::SyntaxError:

>> require 'psych'
=> true
>> begin; raise Psych::SyntaxError; rescue; puts "GOT IT"; end
# Psych::SyntaxError: Psych::SyntaxError
#   from (irb):8
#   from /Users/donovan/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.2-p180/bin/irb:16:in `<main>'
>> Psych::SyntaxError.ancestors
=> [Psych::SyntaxError, SyntaxError, ScriptError, Exception, Object, PP::ObjectMixin, Kernel, BasicObject]
>> begin; raise Psych::SyntaxError; rescue Exception; puts "GOT IT"; end
GOT IT

Notice that in my example rescue Exception does catch it. You should generally be as specific as you can when rescuing unless you really need to rescue all Exceptions. Be aware that suppressing backtraces is good when the exception is something you expect, but if you don't expect it in general it makes debugging much harder.

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The answer was to rescue it on the executable file at bin/<exe>. Thanks for suggesting

begin
  Cf::CLI.start
rescue Psych::SyntaxError
  $stderr.puts "\n\tError during processing: #{$!.message}\n\n"
end
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