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This is my class employee, and another ones from Employee (it's only an example classes):

public class Employee
{
    public int EmployeeID { get; set; }
    public Type type { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Manager : Employee
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // Bla bla
    }
}

public class Salesman : Employee
{
    public void DoAnotherSomething()
    {
        // Bla bla
    }
}

As you can see, my Employee class has a Type property, that contains Manager or Salesman. I don't want to use many switch cases, so is there way to create the object knowing the type variable?

UPDATE 1:

All right, I mean. In my real program. I'm using many switch cases to create the object:

        Employee employee = new Employee();
        // I do somethings to get the values to employee I store it in a Employee list

        // Then I need to create the particular object of each one, I need to travel all 
        // the list an create its instance
        switch (employee.Type)
        {
            case Manager:
                employee = new Manager();

                // Some stuff
                break;
            case Salesman:
                employee = new Salesman();

                // Some stuff
                break;
        }

In my real code, I need to use 130 cases, more or less. So I want to implement another way to avoid this one.

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3  
Creating an instance of a type based on the value of an instance? Is this like traveling back in time? –  Uwe Keim Aug 23 '11 at 19:40
3  
Maybe it's just me, but I don't understand this question. Is it about creating instances without using new? Is it trying to avoid switch cases (what switch cases?) ? Is it about creating the type variable without knowing what type it is? Could the OP clarify? –  Michael Aug 23 '11 at 19:41
1  
You can create an instance with Activator.CreateInstance, but I have a feeling if you think this through, you don't really want to do this. What are you trying to accomplish? –  Anthony Pegram Aug 23 '11 at 19:41
1  
Can you explain the intent of the "Type" property? An object's declared type can always be resolved using then GetType() method. It seems that perhaps you want to be using polymorphism around the "DoSomething" method? –  Reddog Aug 23 '11 at 19:43
    
Why are you doing it this way? What is that Type even for? You already have concrete derived objects that are one type or the other. You can test in code what they are with a simple "is" check. –  Joe Aug 23 '11 at 19:43

6 Answers 6

If you are trying to avoid switching to set the Type property, you could define a constructor on Employee which takes type as a parameter:

protected Employee(Type type) { 
    this.type = type;
}

And call it from each subclass's constructor:

public Manager() : base(typeof(Manager)) { }

This pattern also usually calls for Employee to be declared as abstract, so that you can't accidentally create an Employee that isn't a known type. If you want Employees that are just Employees, you could leave it as a concrete (non-abstract) class, and define a constructor that calls the new constructor I suggested, as follows:

public Employee() : this(typeof(Employee)) { }
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This looks like a good practice. Although I'm not sure if Type property must be declared in Employee, please check the update anyway. –  oscar.fimbres Aug 23 '11 at 20:00

Instead of inheriting class Employee, why not create an interface IEmployee and have each "Employee" type class you want to create implement that interface?

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Yes, I guess is the best option. So if I use that interface. Can I have a IEmployee list, right? Check my update please –  oscar.fimbres Aug 23 '11 at 20:04
    
Yes, you can have List<IEmployee>. If you need all your class types to share common methods, you could go a step further and have a base class called EmployeeBase which each class type would inherit. –  Nurvx Aug 23 '11 at 20:41
    
Will you post me an example?, please –  oscar.fimbres Aug 23 '11 at 20:44

You never want to switch-on-types. That is a code smell that you are using OOP incorrectly. Instead, you should always strive to use your classes polymorphically. If I understand your question correctly, you have an Employee, and want to make another of the same type. This is called the Virtual Constructor idiom, and is usually handled with a virtual Clone method:

class Employee
{
  public virtual Employee Clone();
};

class Manager
{
  public override Manager Clone()
  {
     return new Manager(this);
  }
};

or something similar.

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It sounds here like you want a Factory Pattern to take some descriminator and create an instance and return it through a static method:

class EmployeeFactory
{
  public static Employee NewEmployee(EmployeeType type)
  {
     Employee emp = null;
     switch (type)
     {
        case EmployeeType.Manager :
           emp = new Manager();
           break;
        case EmployeeType.Salesman :
           emp = new Salesman();
           break;
     }
     return emp;
  }
}
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You could do a

var factory = new Dictionary<Type, Func<Employee>> {
    Type.Mgr, ()=>new Manager(),
    Type.Sales, ()=>new Salesman()
};

And use it like

var salesman = factory[Type.Sales](); //creates a salesman

(Assuming this is what your question is asking for). But I agree with the other posters, if this is what you're asking for, it's generally considered bad practice anyway.

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As you're already having the type, you can use System.Activator?

Type type = typeof(Manager);  
var manager = (Manager) Activator.CreateInstance(type);

Understanding the business case will help answering specifically. It's not clear why you want to instantiate an object where you already know the Type. Instead of passing in the Type-parameter to your factory method, why not pass in a Func or the object directly?

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