Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im trying to overload the assignment operator and would like to clear a few things up if thats ok.

I have a non member function, bool operator==( const MyClass& obj1, const myClass& obj2 ) defined oustide of my class.

I cant get at any of my private members for obvious reasons.

So what I think I need to do is to overload the assignment operator. And make assignments in the non member function.

With that said, I think I need to do the following:

  1. use my functions and copy information using strcpy or strdup. I used strcpy.
  2. go to the assignment operator, bool MyClass::operator=( const MyClass& obj1 );
  3. Now we go to the function overloading (==) and assign obj2 to obj1.

I dont have a copy constructor, so I'm stuck with these:

class Class
{
private:
m_1;
m_2;
public:
..
};

void Class::Func1(char buff[]) const
{   
    strcpy( buff, m_1 );
    return;
}
void Class::Func2(char buff[]) const
{
    strcpy( buff, m_2 );
    return;
}

bool Class& Class::operator=(const Class& obj)
{ 
    if ( this != &obj ) // check for self assignment.
    {
    	strcpy( m_1, obj.m_1 );	
    	// do this for all other private members.
    }
    return *this;
}

bool operator== (const Class& obj1, const Class& obj2)
{
         Class MyClass1, MyClass2;
    MyClass1 = obj1;
    MyClass2 = obj2;

         MyClass2 = MyClass1;
         // did this change anything?
// Microsofts debugger can not get this far.
    return true;
}

So as you can probably tell, I'm completely lost in this overloading. Any tips? I do have a completed version overloading the same operator, only with ::, so my private members won't lose scope. I return my assignments as true and it works in main. Which is the example that I have in my book.

Will overloading the assignment operator and then preforming conversions in the operator== non member function work? Will I then be able to assign objects to each other in main after having completed that step?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am guessing that you want to compare the two objects. In that case, you can just overload the operator == in class "Class". You don't need assignment operator.

    class Class
    {
    public:
        Class(int i) : m_i(i){}

         bool operator==( const Class& rhs)
         {
        	return m_i == rhs.m_i;
         }
    private:
        int m_i;

    };


int main()
{
   Class t1(10), t2(10);
   bool b = (t1 == t2);
}
share|improve this answer

You have a couple of obvious mistakes here and there is some confusion about what you are actually trying to achieve. Firstly, the assignment operator operator = is meant to copy the value from one instance to another. The return value of the assignment operator is almost always a non constant reference to the target of the copy, so that you can chain assignments:

Class & operator=(const Class &rhs)
{
  // copy the members

  return *this;
}

The comparison operator operator == is meant to perform a comparison of two instances. It returns a boolean true if they are equal:

boolean operator==(const Class &rhs) const
{
  // check if they are equal
  return something;
}

The confusion is why are you trying to copy values around, or maybe assign to the instances in the comparison operator?

share|improve this answer
    
You have a little mistake, since assignment operator have right to left associative, we have that a = b = c is evaluated to (a = (b = c)), so it is ok, and recommended to return a const reference. –  Ismael Apr 4 '09 at 19:59
    
yeah that's true, although effective C++ (Scott Meyers) says that the C++ standard says that you should return non-const reference. This is to make it compatible with the (admitedly weird) behaviour of builtins, where it is actually legal to do (a = b) = c for something like ints –  1800 INFORMATION Apr 4 '09 at 23:05

Op== isn't the assignment operator. T& Op= (const T&) is.

bool operator==(const T& lhs, const T& rhs) is the operation to compare two Ts. It returns true if lhs is equal to rhs, for whatever definition of "equal" you want to code.

share|improve this answer

I am not sure whether I understood the question correctly. But if you trying to check the equality using a non-member function and can't do this only because you can't access the private members of the class, then you can declare the non-member function as a friend function and use it like this:

class Test
{
public:
    Test(int i) : m_i(i){}
private:
    int m_i;

    friend bool operator==(Test&  first, Test& second);
};

bool operator==(Test&  first, Test& second)
{
    return first.m_i == second.m_i;
}

int main()
{
   Test t1(10), t2(10);
   bool b = (t1 == t2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Friend isn't a good option, I believe. –  aJ. Apr 4 '09 at 7:30
    
writing OP== in Class is just sufficient, right? –  aJ. Apr 4 '09 at 7:33
    
Friend is the way to go ... when we want to implement the comparison operator: unlike accessors (getters) that expose details, it enforces encapsulation (by hiding those ame details). But don't forget the "const" –  Luc Hermitte Apr 4 '09 at 14:44
    
aJ, making op==() a member function will break the symetries in case the class support implicit conversions from other types. –  Luc Hermitte Apr 4 '09 at 14:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.