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An app I am working on gets Canadian addresses from a number of external sources and maps them. A not uncommon source of mapping errors arises from data-entry mistakes in the postal code, ie, entering an uppercase o instead of a zero, an uppercase i instead of a one, and so on.

For the purpose of this question, assume all postal code data has had all whitespace removed, has been uppercased, and is truncated to 6 characters if longer than that. In that case, a valid Canadian postal code would be in the format "A1A1A1". What is an elegant way to make the replacements described above?

We have a working solution, but this has become an interesting question in our office, just to see what people come up with. So far, nothing that screams "awesome."

Some other conditions:

  • If the postal code is invalid already (eg only 4 characters long) feel free to either update it or ignore it
  • The replacements should work both ways, ie invalid letters should be converted to numbers, and invalid numbers should be converted to letters.
  • It has to be done in ruby, because this is a rails app
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Cant your mapping service correct for these errors? Google maps has a great API and bad data dosen't even phase it. –  Devin M Aug 23 '11 at 20:13
    
You sound like a person who would (given some skill) write a compiler that guesses the intent of the user, silently ignoring what's actually been written, errors or not... –  Blindy Aug 23 '11 at 20:14
    
@Devin: Maybe, although we're being forced to use Bing, so who knows? The point is really just to come up with an interesting answer to the problem –  Marc Aug 23 '11 at 20:16
    
@Blindy: I assume the intent of the user is to get their address mapped correctly, and since I can't tell the user to enter the proper postal code, I am guessing they meant to enter it correctly –  Marc Aug 23 '11 at 20:18
1  
You are correct if it's another format, but it's not. A Canadian postal code MUST BE A1A1A1. Anything else is wrong. Therefore, trying to change AIA1A1 to A1A1A1 is a reasonable assumption, since the original is incorrect anyway. –  Marc Aug 23 '11 at 20:24

3 Answers 3

def clean_postal_code
  swaps = {'L' => '1', 'O' => '0'} #fill with whatever necessary substitutions
  pc = self.postal_code
  (pc.size/2).times do |n|
    swaps.each do |letter, number|
      pc[n*2+1] = pc[n*2+1].chr.gsub(letter, number) #only want numbers on odd indices
      pc[n*2] = pc[n*2].chr.gsub(number, letter) #only characters on even indices
    end
  end
  self.postal_code = pc
end
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Readable and maintainable. I like it. –  Marc Aug 23 '11 at 20:56

I'm taking this as a bit of a how compact can you make the code challenge. I would NOT necessarily actually writing it like this - something like Tron's answer would likely be much more maintainable.

That said, something like this should in principle work:

def clean_pc(pc)
  pc.split(/(?<=\G..)/).map {|a| a[0].tr('01','OL') + a[1].tr('OoLliI','001111') }.join
end

(UPDATE)

... or, much easier to read, and probably maintainable enough for production use:

def clean_pc(pc)
  pc.chars.each_slice(2).map {|a| a[0].tr('01','OL') + a[1].tr('OoLliI','001111')}.join
end
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Nice! Thanks for getting in the spirit of it. –  Marc Aug 23 '11 at 20:43
    
Thanks @Marc. Added a cleaner version that might do the job better. Thanks for sparking my interest! –  Paul Russell Aug 23 '11 at 21:00

Similar to Tron's but (IMHO) a bit simpler and doesn't require the number-to-letter map to be symmetric:

chars = { '0' => 'O', '1' => 'I'             } # etc.
nums  = { 'O' => '0', 'I' => '1', 'Q' => '0' } # etc.
maps  = [
        ->(c) { chars[c.upcase] || c.upcase }, 
        ->(c) { nums[ c.upcase] || c }
]
clean = (0 ... input.length).map { |i| maps[i % 2].call(s[i]) }.join

You start with a dirty input and get clean as the fixed up version. For example, this will convert 'aib100' to 'A1B1O0'.

You could wrap it up in a function if desired:

def unmangle(input)
    chars = { '0' => 'O', '1' => 'I'             } # etc.
    nums  = { 'O' => '0', 'I' => '1', 'Q' => '0' } # etc.
    maps  = [
            ->(c) { chars[c.upcase] || c.upcase }, 
            ->(c) { nums[ c.upcase] || c }
    ]
    (0 ... input.length).map { |i| maps[i % 2].call(input[i]) }.join
end

clean = unmangle('aib100')
# 'A1B1O0'

You could also use this (or various other similar constructions):

(0 ... input.length).inject(input) { |s, i| s[i] = maps[i % 2].call(s[i]); s }

If you don't like the map/join version.

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That's nice too! Thanks. –  Marc Aug 24 '11 at 12:37

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