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I'm trying to implement Peterson's algorithm in Java, and have created the following for the moment

public class Peterson {
    private volatile boolean[] flag = new boolean[2];
    private volatile int victim;

    public void lock(int id)
    {
        //System.out.println(id);
        int i = id;
        int j = 1 - id; 
        flag[i] = true;
        victim = i;
        while (flag[j] && victim == i) {};
    }

    public void unlock(int id)
    {
        flag[id] = false;
    }
}

I got the following code to test the lock ...

class Counter {
    private int value;

    public Counter(int c)   {
        value = c;
    }

    public int get()
    {
        return value;
    }

    public int getAndIncrement()    {       
        return value++;
    }
}


class Thread1 implements Runnable   {
    private Counter c;
    private int id;
    private List<Integer> values;
    private Peterson lock;

    public Thread1(Counter c, int id, List<Integer> values, Peterson l) {
        this.c = c;
        this.id = id;
        this.values = values;
        this.lock = l;
    }

    public void run() {

        while (true)
        {
            lock.lock(id);
            try {
                try {

                    if (c.get() > 20000)
                        return;

                    int n = c.getAndIncrement();
                    values.add(n);
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            finally {
                lock.unlock(id);
            }
        }
    }
}

public class Tmp    {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException   {

        Counter  c = new Counter(1);
        Thread[] t = new Thread[2];
        List<Integer> values = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        Peterson l =  new Peterson();

        for (int i = 0; i < t.length; ++i)  {
            t[i] = new Thread(new Thread1(c, i, values, l));
            t[i].start();
        }

        System.out.println(values.size());
    }
}

and although I expect System.out.println(values.size()); to print 20000 It print on each run different numbers. Why is this? What did I do wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you don't create a memory barrier when you unlock to guarantee the happens before

add a volatile boolean barr and write true to it in unlock and change the while in the lock to while (barr && flag[j] && victim == i) {};

that and you don't wait on the threads you created

for (int i = 0; i < t.length; ++i)  {
    t[i] = new Thread(new Thread1(c, i, values, l));
    t[i].start();
}

for (int i = 0; i < t.length; ++i)  {
    try{
        t[i].join();
    }catch(InterruptedException e){
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();//don't expect it but good practice to handle anyway
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I dont get what you mean with barr, I should set barr = true in unlock, how about in lock method? –  Mario Frazili Aug 23 '11 at 21:26
    
@mario you want actions prior to the unlock to happen before an actions subsequent to a successful lock, so you only need to read barr in lock (the happens before with volatiles are only guaranteed on the same field) –  ratchet freak Aug 23 '11 at 21:39
    
Seem I got wrong results because of joing . Thank you :) –  Mario Frazili Aug 24 '11 at 20:49

I guess, it's because lock() method in Lock class isn't atomic. Specifically, this code modifies two memory addresses and then checks condition using both of them w/o locking:

public void lock(int id)
{
    ...
    flag[i] = true;
    victim = i;
    while (flag[j] && victim == i) {};
}

Will algorithm work if two threads interleave while executing

    flag[i] = true;
    victim = i;

Secondly, because private volatile boolean[] flag = new boolean[2] marks array reference as volatile, not array contents.

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I didnt understand your first sentence, what you mean "lock" in Lock class isn't atomic? About the second, is there a way to mark array elements as volatile? –  Mario Frazili Aug 23 '11 at 21:13
    
@Mario Updated my answer. –  Victor Sorokin Aug 23 '11 at 21:18
    
For volatile 2-booleans array, what about substituting it with volatile int with 4 possible values? –  Victor Sorokin Aug 23 '11 at 21:31
    
@victor that's not really acceptable because what if thread 0 sets bit 0 to true while thread 1 sets bit 1 to true using flag = flag|1<<id; (this is like the standard issue with increment: load->alter->store) either 01, 10 (both incorrect) or 11 (correct) you need a atomic compare and swap to solve this with an int –  ratchet freak Aug 23 '11 at 21:49
    
@ratchet agreed –  Victor Sorokin Aug 23 '11 at 21:51

As the other guys pointed out, Java has no volatile read/write on array elements.

You can use AtomicIntegerArray which has get() and set() with volatile effects.

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