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I am wanting to write a anagram type solver in Ruby but it will work against a list of words, like so.

List of words is:

the
these
one
owner

I would allow the user to input some letters, e.g noe, and it would search the word list for words that it can make using the letters the user has input and would bring back one and if they entered "eth" or even "the" it would bring back the. I have been trying to think of a efficient way to do this but I have been looping around each word, match a letter in the word, checking the word for each letter and both lengths match. Can anyone give advice of a better and more efficient way to do this?

Cheers

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1  
Is there a question? What have you tried? –  Dan W Aug 23 '11 at 21:17
    
Yea, sorry I will edit the question. –  RailsSon Aug 23 '11 at 21:17
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7 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The big idea is that all anagrams are identical when sorted. So if you build a hash (don't know what Ruby calls these) of lists, where the keys are sorted words and the value is the list of words that sorts to the given key, then you can find anagrams very quickly by sorting the word and looking up in your hash.

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Great idea. How about multi word anagram solver? Like rrenaud => Ad Rerun? –  kimmmo Aug 24 '11 at 6:57
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rrenaud's answer is great, and here is an example of how to construct such a hash in ruby, given an array named "words" that contains all of the words in your dictionary:

@words_hash = words.each_with_object(Hash.new []) do |word, hash|
  hash[word.chars.sort] += [word]
end

The code above assumes ruby 1.9.2. If you are using an older version then chars won't exist but you can use .split('').sort.

The default object of the hash is set to be the empty array, which makes the coding easier in some cases because you don't have to worry about the hash giving you nil.

Source: https://github.com/DavidEGrayson/anagram/blob/master/david.rb

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That's identical to words.group_by {|word| word.chars.sort } –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 24 '11 at 1:10
    
Cool, but actually you would need to do this: @words_hash = words.group_by {|word| word.chars.sort}; @words_hash.default = [] –  David Grayson Aug 26 '11 at 14:30
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One solution could be:

def combine_anagrams(words)
  output_array = Array.new(0)
  words.each do |w1|
    temp_array = []
    words.each do |w2|
      if (w2.downcase.split(//).sort == w1.downcase.split(//).sort)
        temp_array.push(w2)
      end
    end
    output_array.push(temp_array)
  end
  return output_array.uniq
end
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This might be what you're looking for: Solving Anagrams In Ruby

Here's another approach (it's the top response): Anagram Solver In Python

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I couldn't resist solving this ruby quiz :)

class String

  def permutation(&block)
    arr = split(//)
    arr.permutation { |i| yield i.join }
  end
end


wordlist = ["one", "two"]

"noe".permutation do |i|
  puts "match found: #{i}" if wordlist.include?(i)
end

The basic idea is that it creates and array and uses it's permutation function to come up with the result. It may not be efficient but I find it elegant. :D

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def combine_anagrams(words)
  cp = 0
  hash = Hash.new []
  words.each do |word|
    cp += 1
    (cp..words.count).each do |i|
      hash[word.to_s.chars.sort.join] += [word]
    end
    hash[word.to_s.chars.sort.join] = hash[word.to_s.chars.sort.join].uniq
  end
  return hash
end
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Here's quite similar of mine. Reading from a dictionary file and comparing sorted chars as an array. Sorting is done on preselected candidates.

def anagrams(n)
  text = File.open('dict.txt').read

  candidates = []
  text.each_line do |line|
    if (line.length - 1) == n.length
      candidates << line.gsub("\n",'')
    end
  end

  result = []

  candidates.each do |word|
    if word.chars.sort == n.chars.sort
      result << word
    end
  end

  result

end
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