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I have the following query

SELECT
   YEAR(N.TICKETDATE) AS TICKETYEAR,
   MONTH(N.TICKETDATE) AS TICKETMONTH,
   SUM(DISTINCT N.NETWEIGHTHAULED)/COUNT(DISTINCT N.NETWEIGHTHAULED) AS NETTONSHAULED ,
   COUNT(N.TICKETID) AS TICKETCOUNT,
   COUNT(DISTINCT N.TICKETID)/MAX(DATEDIFF(D,N.TICKETDATE,(DATEADD(M,1,N.TICKETDATE))))AS AVGPERDAY      
FROM
   AX2009_1_COPY.DBO.NAT_JOBLINE N
      INNER JOIN AX2009_1_COPY.DBO.SALESLINE S
         ON N.SALESID = S.SALESID
      INNER JOIN AX2009_1_COPY.DBO.CUSTINVOICEJOUR J
         ON N.SALESID = J.SALESID
WHERE
   J.INVOICEID NOT LIKE 'CCR%' AND
   N.TICKETID NOT LIKE 'DMTKT%'
GROUP BY
   YEAR(N.TICKETDATE),
   MONTH(N.TICKETDATE)
ORDER BY
   YEAR(N.TICKETDATE),
   MONTH(N.TICKETDATE)

It takes 12 minutes to run. I am not quite sure of how to cut down the time the query takes. I know the joins could probably use some work but I am having a hard time finding something that actually works. Could you all please help me out and give me some pointers or a good site to find the answer?

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1  
"dire" not "dyer"! – koan Aug 23 '11 at 21:20
    
You don't state whether you have any indexes on your tables. This suggests that you don't know of the importance of indexes. So, what indexes do you have on the tables, and what volumes of data? – Vinny Roe Aug 23 '11 at 21:44
    
Thanks for the English lesson :-) – Maximus Aug 23 '11 at 21:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Start by looking at the execution plan to determine what parts of the query are causing it to run slowly. If you are going to be doing any amount of work with SQL Server this is something you should know how to do. Here are some decent articles worth reading:

Once you have examined the execution plan you may be able to determine if the creation of indexes could improve performance.

Another option would be to create indexed views that contain persisted forms of your aggregate data. This can save you from having to do these calculations at run time...

Good luck!

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1  
Thank you these articles are very useful! I will read them along with the hints here in depth and see what is going on – Maximus Aug 23 '11 at 21:41

first of all I would ensure that you have index on foreign keys. I would suggest you to consider, whether you can create artifical INT id instead of using varchar ID for ticket and invoice. You can consider adding two columns to the database: year and month, because if you use year(date) you cannot use indexes. Lastly, i would create combined index for invoiceid, ticketid, year, month in exactly this order, because in this order they occur in your query

UPDATE:

Actually better approach is suggested by someone else and firstly you should investigate what is the real issue of your slow query. Though you might want to use some of my ideas

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In general, see my answer to a related question here. Without doing that, you won't really know what's wrong.

If I absolutely had to guess, I'd suspect that it was the grouping on the result of the Date function, and selectively denormalize those dates into a DateParts table which had Year and Month columns.

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