Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created an application that is basically a deamon written in C. It is stopped and started using a shell script. Specifically, to stop it, kill is used to send a SIGTERM signal. The PID of the daemon is stored in a file on the disc in the format:

1234\n

A user reports that they cannot stop the daemon, the shell script returns the error:

kill: `': not a pid or valid job spec

The PID is fetched and used in the shell script as follows:

if [ -f "${PID_FILE}" ]
then
    FCPID=`head -n 1 $PID_FILE`
    kill -n SIGTERM "${FCPID}"
    RETVAL=$?
    if [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ]
    then
        rm -f ${PID_FILE}
        echo "OK"
    else
        echo "FAIL"
        exit 1
    fi
else
    echo "Wasn't running"
    exit 1
fi

It works fine on my machine (Ubuntu 10.04) and so far no one else has reported this problem. Does anyone recognise the error or is there a mistake in the shell script that could cause problems on some platforms?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That error occurs when you pass kill an empty arg as a PID, i.e.

[me@home]$ kill -n SIGTERM ""
kill: `': not a pid or valid job spec

My guess is your script throws up that error when the PID_FILE exists but is empty, hence ${FCPID} ends up as an empty string.

Check that the start script is actually writing out the PID_FILE correctly on your user's machine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - an empty PID argument gives this exact error. –  SlappyTheFish Aug 24 '11 at 8:07

What is kill -n? I think you meant kill -s. Also, we can check that FCPID is being set.

FCPID=`head -n 1 $PID_FILE`
if [ -n "${FCPID}" ] ; then
  kill -s SIGTERM "${FCPID}"
  ... # the rest of what happens after kill
fi
share|improve this answer
    
The -n flag allows you to pass a signal number instead of a name, so I think kill -n SIGTERM should be equivalent to kill -s TERM. Interestingly the -n option is only mentioned in kill --help and not in man kill. Can anyone clarify on what is most correct/compatible? –  SlappyTheFish Aug 24 '11 at 8:07
    
Aha, so the -n option is ksh93. Bourne shell and C Shell don't appear to have this, so the most compatible would be kill -15 PID –  SlappyTheFish Aug 24 '11 at 8:29

Add the flag -kvx(assuming you are using ksh) in your shebang line like below.

#!usr/bin/ksh -kvx

After executing the script you could clearly see what is the argument that is getting passed to the kill command.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.