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I have this:

def valid_attributes
  { :email => "some_#{rand(9999)}@thing.com" }
end

For Rspec testing right? But I would like to do something like this:

def valid_attributes
  static user_id = 0
  user_id += 1
  { :email => "some_#{user_id}@thing.com" }
end

I don't want user_id to be accessible from anywhere but that method, is this possible with Ruby?

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2  
The short answer is no, there's no such thing as static in Ruby. Why not let the database handle your auto-incrementing key? –  Emily Aug 23 '11 at 22:46
    
Because it's a method to generate valid attributes for Rspec testing, and some things must be unique. –  Zequez Aug 23 '11 at 22:50
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This answer is a little larger in scope than your question, but I think it gets at the root of what you're trying to do, and will be the easiest and most maintainable.

I think what you're really looking for here is factories. Try using something like factory_girl, which will make a lot of testing much easier.

First, you'd set up a factory to create whatever type of object it is you're testing, and use a sequence for the email attribute:

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :model do
    sequence(:email) {|n| "person#{n}@example.com" }
    # include whatever else is required to make your model valid
  end
end

Then, when you need valid attributes, you can use

Factory.attributes_for(:model)

You can also use Factory.create and Factory.build to create saved and unsaved instances of the model.

There's explanation of a lot more of the features in the getting started document, as well as instructions on how to add factories to your project.

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Thanks! I'll definitively check that gem out! ^^ –  Zequez Aug 24 '11 at 3:16
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This is a closure case. Try this

lambda {
  user_id = 0

  self.class.send(:define_method, :valid_attributes) do
    user_id += 1
    { :email => "some_#{user_id}@thing.com" }
  end

}.call

Wrapping everything in lambda allows the variables defined within lambda to only exist in the scope. You can add other methods also. Good luck!

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I tried your code by adding two p valid_attributes after it, but I got Error NoMethodError: undefined method '+' for nil:NilClass. I guess user_id inside def is a local variable initialized as nil. Maybe you can use the closure in another way. :) –  Sony Santos Aug 25 '11 at 0:32
    
Hi Sony, I've forgot about def. I've changed it to define_method already so it now should be able to access user_id. Other methods defined within lambda this way can also share the user_id variable. –  RubyFanatic Aug 25 '11 at 5:14
1  
Ok, but you must use self.class.send :define_method, :valid_attributes, since define_method is a private class method. Anyway, I prefer your solution over mine, because in my case valid_attributes is a proc (which must be called with call or [] in 1.8.7), and in your case it's a genuine method. –  Sony Santos Aug 25 '11 at 11:15
    
You're right Sony. I've updated the changes :) –  RubyFanatic Aug 26 '11 at 4:00
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I'd use an instance variable:

def valid_attributes
  @user_id ||= 0
  @user_id += 1
  { :email => "some_#{@user_id}@thing.com" }
end
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The only variables Ruby has are local variables, instance variables, class variables and global variables. None of them fit what you're after.

What you probably need is a singleton that stores the user_id, and gives you a new ID number each time. Otherwise, your code won't be thread-safe.

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You can use a closure:

def validator_factory
  user_id = 0
  lambda do
    user_id += 1
    { :email => "some_#{user_id}@thing.com" }
  end
end

valid_attributes = validator_factory

valid_attributes.call  #=>  {:email=>"some_1@thing.com"}
valid_attributes.call  #=>  {:email=>"some_2@thing.com"}

This way user_id won't be accessible outside.

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