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Testcase:

Public Class T
    Public Event A()

    Public Sub New()
        RaiseEvent A()
    End Sub
End Class

Module Module1
    Sub Main()
        Dim obj = New T()
        AddHandler obj.A, AddressOf handleA
    End Sub

    Sub handleA()
        Debug.WriteLine("!")
    End Sub
End Module

Of course AddHandler hasn't run yet when New is fired.

So I tried like this:

Public Class T
    Public Event A()

    Public Sub New()
        RaiseEvent A()
    End Sub
End Class

Module Module1
    Dim WithEvents obj As T

    Sub Main()
        obj = New T()
    End Sub

    Sub handleA() Handles obj.A
        Debug.WriteLine("!")
    End Sub
End Module

But even here it seems the handler isn't registered until after New has completed.

However, in real life the event is raised within code that's semantically part of the object initialisation, and I'd really rather not have to create some Initialize function.

Do I have any other option?

share|improve this question
    
@stakx: Thanks for your edit. Unfortunately, you broke the code (obj = was deliberate), renamed functions to fit your personal coding style (why?) and the constructor tag does not seem at all useful. Also I don't see why a "VB.NET-specific" title is a problem for a VB.NET-specific question. For these reasons I have rolled-back your edit. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 5 '13 at 21:27
    
Sure, roll back if you disagree. No problem. Since you seem to be wondering about the "why" of my edit, let me answer briefly: 1. I did not rename to fit my personal coding style, but to widely accepted and "officially" documented .NET coding guidelines. 2. How did Dim obj As New T() vs. Dim obj = New T() break your code? It didn't. Au contraire, your version only works when Option Infer is enabled, while the former (As) will always work. –  stakx Oct 5 '13 at 23:34
    
3. I changed the title's New to "constructor" because I had the same question, but for C#. I figured a wider audience might be interested in your question, and that change would make your question easier to find for non-VB.NET-focused people. 4. Same for the constructor tag; it makes your question easier to find. -- So much for my reasons to edit, but I won't interfere with your rollback. +1 for a good question, anyhow. –  stakx Oct 5 '13 at 23:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It makes no sense to put code which raises an event within a constructor, unless some other code which executes within the same constructor is able to register to handle the event (e.g. through some indirect method call). That in turn would require leaking Me before the constructor has completed, which is generally a bad idea.

Basically: try to avoid this design. During construction an object shouldn't be visible to the outside world, and that includes event handlers.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid of that. The object's initialisation includes performing some activities, some statistics about which I'd like to raise events for. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 23 '11 at 23:14
1  
@Tomalak: It sounds like you're doing too much in your constructor... –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '11 at 23:17
    
Only stuff which should only be done once, and which the rest of the object's behaviour relies upon having been done. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 23 '11 at 23:19
    
@Tomalak: But which needs to be exposed before the rest of the object? It sounds fairly odd to me, to be honest. Have you considered creating a factory type which has the event handlers and which is responsible for doing the initial work, broadcasting it and then creating the object? –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '11 at 23:21
1  
@Tomalak: During a constructor, an object is half-formed. That's not a nice state to work in. There could still be derived class constructors still to run, executing any virtual methods is dodgy etc. You could pass an event handler into the constructor if you must... but otherwise, how would you expect anything else to subscribe to the event? –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '11 at 9:18

I agree with Jon about putting events into constructors - specifically because the standard event pattern does expose the instance of the sender in the event call and, as Jon rightly says, this is a bad idea.

However, it's not a bad idea if you only pass out values. And you can do that easily.

Try this:

Public Class T
    Public Sub New(a As Action)
        a()
    End Sub
End Class

Module Module1
    Sub Main()
        Dim obj = New T(AddressOf handleA)
    End Sub

    Sub handleA()
        Debug.WriteLine("!")
    End Sub
End Module
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I like events because T needs no knowledge of any specific handlers, and I definitely want to keep that! :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 24 '11 at 8:37
    
@Tomalak - Then I don't think there's any way to do what you want. Keep in mind that events and actions are both just delegates. One is safe for you to use and the other is not. –  Enigmativity Aug 24 '11 at 8:49

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