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I'm encrypting data in chunks. I'm passing each chunk of data to a Task like yay:

private static Task<string> EncryptChunk( byte[] buffer, CryptoEngine c )
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
    Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
    {
        tcs.SetResult( c.Encrypt( buffer ) );
    } );
    return tcs.Task;
}

As I debug in the code that calls this method I can see that it's passing proper chunks as the buffer parameter. If I set a breakpoint inside StartNew above, however, I see that the buffer is always the last buffer encountered by the main thread.

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Show us the calling code, including the creation of buffer. –  Jason Aug 23 '11 at 23:11
    
Does each EncryptChunk call get passed a different byte[] or are they all being passed the same array reference? –  cdhowie Aug 23 '11 at 23:12
    
Side note: Why not just return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => c.Encrypt(buffer)); and do away with the TaskCompletionSource altogether? –  Cameron Aug 23 '11 at 23:12
    
@Cameron: I just added that to my answer too :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '11 at 23:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My guess is that you're reusing the same byte array. The parameter will be captured - but in this case as nothing in your method captures the parameter, it's effectively capturing the reference. If you want to be able to reuse the original array (i.e. populate it with new data) but still read the old data within the task, you need to make a copy of the data. e.g.

private static Task<string> EncryptChunk( byte[] buffer, CryptoEngine c )
{
    buffer = buffer.ToArray(); // Copy the data
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
    Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
    {
        tcs.SetResult( c.Encrypt( buffer ) );
    } );
    return tcs.Task;
}

As an aside, why are you using TaskCompletionSource here, instead of just:

return Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() => c.Encrypt(buffer));

or using type inference:

return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => c.Encrypt(buffer));
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Is ToArray better than Clone here? –  Gabe Aug 23 '11 at 23:24
1  
@Gabe: Not particularly. No cast required, that's all :) Probably slower, mind you. –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '11 at 23:27
    
duh - need to make deep copy. Sorry for stupid question. Will also use type inference method. –  dudeNumber4 Aug 23 '11 at 23:30

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