Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing an implementation of quicksort to brush up on my C++ skills, but am running into an error that is stumping me. The algorithm seems to be working fine about 25% of the time, but I keep running into the errors the other 75% of the time, where the program reports either a segmentation fault or stack overflow. If anyone could help, it would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

#define size 20

void printSet(int* set);
int* quicksort(int* set, int l);
int* concat(int* less, int countL, int* greater, int countG);

int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));
    int* set;
    set = new int[size];
    for(int i=0; i<size; i++)
        set[i]=rand()%200;
    printSet(set);
    set = quicksort(set, size);
    printSet(set);
    delete set;
    int i;
    cin>> i;
    return 0;
}

int* quicksort(int* set, int l)
{
    //cout<<"QS\n";
    if (l <= 1)
        return set;
    int*      less = new int[l];
    int*   greater = new int[l];
    int pivotIndex = rand() % l, 
          pivotVal = set[pivotIndex],
            countL = 0,
            countG = 0;

    for(int i=0; i<l; i++)
    {
        if (set[i] < pivotVal)
            less[countL++]=set[i];
        else
            greater[countG++]=set[i];
    }
    set = concat(quicksort(less, countL), countL, quicksort(greater, countG), countG);

    return set;
}

int* concat(int* less, int countL, int* greater, int countG)
{
    //cout<<"concat\n";
    int* set;
    set = new int[size];

    int i;

    for(i=0; i<countL; i++)
        set[i]=less[i];
    for(int j=0; j<countG; j++)
        set[i+j]=greater[j];

    return set;
}

void printSet(int* set)
{
    cout<<"******************\nPrinting Set\n";
    for(int i=0; i< size; i++)
    {
        cout<<i<<": "<<set[i]<<endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
What exactly does the error say? – Jared Ng Aug 23 '11 at 23:34
    
What's the error? Try stepping through it with a debugger. – Toolbox Aug 23 '11 at 23:35
    
You also have a memory leak in your quicksort function, and also in the concat function. – Seth Carnegie Aug 23 '11 at 23:36
    
also your less and greater arrays are never being deleted. On a large data set this could leak a lot of memory. Edit: beaten to it – smitec Aug 23 '11 at 23:37
    
I just edited the question to include what errors were getting reported (I ran it on my machine a few times). Hope this clarifies things! – templatetypedef Aug 23 '11 at 23:59

I believe that one of your errors is in this line in main:

delete set;

The problem here is that set is an array allocated with new[]. To free its memory, you need to delete it with a matching call to delete[]. This can be fixed by rewriting the line as

delete[] set;

Additionally, your code has the chance to infinitely recurse in some cases. In particular, suppose that you try sorting a list that's two copies of 0. In that case, consider what this code will do:

for(int i=0; i<l; i++)
{
    if (set[i] < pivotVal)
        less[countL++]=set[i];
    else
        greater[countG++]=set[i];
}
set = concat(quicksort(less, countL), countL, quicksort(greater, countG), countG);

Since your pivot element is 0 (it's the only choice!), you'll iterate across the array and put both of the 0's in the array into greater. Consequently, when you recursively invoke quicksort on greater, you'll end up recursively trying to sort the exact same range that you started with, leading to infinite recursion.

To fix this, try updating your code so that you partition into three groups - elements less than the pivot, elements greater than the pivot, and elements equal to the pivot. You would still recurse on the less and greater ranges, but you wouldn't recursively invoke yourself on the equal values. This would ensure that the recursion always is invoked on smaller ranges than what you started with.

Finally, as others have pointed out, your current implementation leaks a lot of memory because you never free any of the temporary arrays you construct. To avoid this, consider replacing your use of raw arrays with std::vector, which does its own memory management and won't leak any memory. Plus, it makes it substantially easier to split the array into regions, since you can just use push_back to append the elements.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
I compiled the code and he was getting a stack overflow because of exactly what you describe. +1 – Seth Carnegie Aug 23 '11 at 23:43
    
@Seth Carnegie- Yeah, I ran it with gdb and valgrind to find these errors. I hope I caught everything! – templatetypedef Aug 23 '11 at 23:43
2  
So that's why the OP didn't feel it was necessary to post what the error message was. – Jared Ng Aug 23 '11 at 23:50
    
Thanks for the help everyone! I really appreciate it. – Luke Aug 24 '11 at 0:01
1  
@Luke- Glad to help out! If this answers your question, be sure to mark the answer accepted to mark the question resolved. – templatetypedef Aug 24 '11 at 0:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.