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I needed to reraise an exception that occurs while executing an async block, after logging the exception.

When I do the following the compiler thinks that I am not calling the reraise function from within the handler. What am I doing wrong?

let executeAsync context = async {
    traceContext.Properties.Add("CorrelationId", context.CorrelationId)
    try
        do! runAsync context
        return None
    with
        | e when isCriticalException(e) ->
            logCriticalException e
            reraise()
        | e ->
            logException e
            return Some(e)
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Rough! I think this is impossible, because reraise corresponds to a special IL instruction that grabs the exception from the top of the stack, but the way async expressions are compiled into a chain of continuations, I don't think the semantics hold!

For the same reason, the following won't compile either:

try
    (null:string).ToString()
with e ->
    (fun () -> reraise())()

In these situations, where I need to handle the exception outside of the actual with body, and would like to emulate reraise (that is, preserve the stack trace of the exception), I use this solution, so all together your code would look like:

let inline reraisePreserveStackTrace (e:Exception) =
    let remoteStackTraceString = typeof<exn>.GetField("_remoteStackTraceString", BindingFlags.Instance ||| BindingFlags.NonPublic);
    remoteStackTraceString.SetValue(e, e.StackTrace + Environment.NewLine);
    raise e

let executeAsync context = async {
    traceContext.Properties.Add("CorrelationId", context.CorrelationId)
    try
        do! runAsync context
        return None
    with
        | e when isCriticalException(e) ->
            logCriticalException e
            reraisePreserveStackTrace e
        | e ->
            logException e
            return Some(e)
}
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This answer is perhaps outdated. In .net 4.5 you can use the ExceptionDispatchInfo class, which does this and also captures Watson bucket info such as assembly of origin and IL offset. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Dax Fohl Oct 11 at 15:10

I ran in to a similar problem, in a different context, but it boils down to this.

Exceptions cannot be thrown onto a different thread - calling reraise() would require an exception handler running in some sense 'above' the original async block in the code.

let runAsync context = async {return ()}
let isCriticalException e = true
let logCriticalException e = ()
let logException e = ()
let executeAsync context = 
    async {
            do! runAsync context
            return None
}

let run = 
    match executeAsync 5 |> Async.Catch |> Async.RunSynchronously with
    |Choice1Of2(t) -> 
        printfn "%A" t
        None
    |Choice2Of2(exn) ->  
            match exn with
            | e when isCriticalException(e) ->
                logCriticalException e
                raise (new System.Exception("See inner exception",e)) //stack trace will be lost at this point if the exn is not wrapped
            | e ->
                logException e
                Some(e)

Note, we still can't use reraise, as we are now calling on a different thread, so we wrap the exception inside another one

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1  
It's more specific then not being able to call reraise from a different thread, it can't be called from a different stackframe. –  Stephen Swensen Aug 24 '11 at 0:39

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