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As the title says Im wondering if these two similar functions can be merged into one:

This one sanitizes general inputs:

function sanitize($input) 
 {
  if(get_magic_quotes_gpc() == true)
    {
     $input = stripslashes($input);
   }
     return htmlspecialchars($input);
}

and this one sanitizes inputs that update a database:

function sanitizeSQL($input) 
 {
  if(get_magic_quotes_gpc() == true)
    {
     $input = stripslashes($input);
   }
     return mysql_real_escape_string(htmlspecialchars($input));
}

maybe with another if statement or something to add or remove the *mysql_real_escape_string()* ? just not sure how to go about it...

As usual all help is appreciated and thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would have sanitizeSQL call sanitize. No duplicate code but different function names.

function sanitizeSQL($input) 
 {
  return mysql_real_esape_string(sanitize($input));
}

If you did want to only have 1 method to call, I would pass in a second parameter:

function sanitize($input, $forSql) 
 {
  if(get_magic_quotes_gpc() == true)
    {
     $input = stripslashes($input);
   }

  $input = htmlspecialchars($input);

  if($forSql == true)
    {
      $input = mysql_real_escape_string($input);
    }

  return $input.
}
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I get how the function knows about get_magic_quotes_gpc() as that is a built in function in itself but how does it know $forSql (used in above answer) is a sql query? (i'm a php novice) :) –  Dizzi Aug 24 '11 at 0:25
2  
@Dizzi the $forSql is meant to be a boolean value, not a sql query. So if you wanted to sanitize input you would call $input = sanitize($input, false). If you wanted to sanatize the input for a database you would call $input = sanitize($input, true). –  briddums Aug 24 '11 at 6:36

Pretty simple to merge them.

function sanitize($input, $sql = false) { // $sql will default to false
    if (get_magic_quotes_gpc() === true) $input = stripslashes($input);
    $input = htmlspecialchars($input);
    return ($sql === true ? mysql_real_escape_string($input) : $input);
}

We just add an $sql variable to say whether or not it needs to be sanitized for SQL.

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function sanitizeBoth($input, $mysqlEscape) 
{
    if(get_magic_quotes_gpc() == true)
    {
        $input = stripslashes($input);
    }
    $return = htmlspecialchars($input);
    if ($mysqlEscape){
        $return = mysql_real_escape_string($return);
    }
    return $return;
}

$mysqlEscape is the switch: If it is true, it works as 'sanitizeSQL', if false as 'sanitize'.

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Let me suggest a different approach. You should either disable magic_quotes, or strip the slashes on all get/post/cookie data as early as possible, following example #2 here.

Don't make this part of your code for preparing HTML or SQL. That should be done separately, when you're actually building HTML documents or SQL statements. And at that point, all you need is htmlspecialchars for HTML, or mysql_real_escape_string for SQL.

Don't make the mistake of thinking there's a "general" sanitizing function that will work for all inputs. In fact, it's best not to think of it as sanitizing at all. Plain text is already plenty sanitary. What you're doing is simply escaping text for a particular output format (HTML, SQL, CSV, PDF, etc.). Each output format has a different escaping method, so there's no approach that will work for all of them. That's why magic_quotes is such a bad idea, and why it needs to be undone as soon as possible.

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