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I have a class with the following members:

  • X
  • Y
  • Width
  • Height

One can create a rectangle with these parameters.

Now my problem is I have a list of this class, List<MyClass>.

I need to compare each object of the list with all the remaining objects in such a way that if the currentObject.Location(X, Y) falls in the rectangle(X, Y, Width, Height) of the other object, I need to delete the other object from the list.

I implemented it with for loops.

But the major problem is: performance. My minimum list count is 300000.

Is there any procedure to improve the performance for this task uisng any of the .Net versions including LINQ?

`public class RectBase { private int _rectId; private PointF _rectLocation; private SizeF _rectSize;

    public RectBase()
    {
        _rectId = -911;
        _rectLocation = new PointF(0, 0);
        _rectSize = new SizeF(0, 0);
    }
    public RectBase(int id, PointF loc, SizeF size)
    {
        _rectId = id;
        _rectLocation = loc;
        _rectSize = size;
    }
    public bool IsIntersected(RectBase otherRectObject)
    {
        RectangleF currentRect = new RectangleF(_rectLocation, _rectSize);
        if (currentRect.Contains(otherRectObject.RectLocation))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
    public int RectId
    {
        get { return _rectId; }
        set { _rectId = value; }
    }
    public PointF RectLocation
    {
        get { return _rectLocation; }
        set { _rectLocation = value; }
    }
    public SizeF RectSize
    {
        get { return _rectSize; }
        set { _rectSize = value; }
    }
}


public class RectProcessor
{
    List<RectBase> _rectList;
    int maxCount = 300000;

    public RectProcessor()
    {
        _rectList = new List<RectBase>();
        FillList();
    }

    private void FillList()
    {
        //  Adding the items to the list with dummy values
        for (int i = 0; i < maxCount; i++)
        {
            int id = i+1;
            PointF loc = new PointF(id, id);
            SizeF sz = new SizeF(id, id);

            RectBase obj = new RectBase(id, loc, sz);

            _rectList.Add(obj);
        }
    }

    private void RemoveIntersectedObjects()
    {
        List<RectBase> filteredList = new List<RectBase>();
        bool isIntersected = false;

        for (int i = 0; i < maxCount; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < maxCount; j++)
            {
                if (_rectList[i].IsIntersected(_rectList[j]))
                {
                    isIntersected = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (!isIntersected)
            {
                filteredList.Add(_rectList[i]); 
            }
            isIntersected = false;
        }
    }
}

`

share|improve this question
    
Feels like a quadtree could help you out here... –  thasc Aug 24 '11 at 0:30
    
Please post a code sample so we can see how you're approaching the problem. –  Jason Aug 24 '11 at 0:31
    
Linq is not going to be any faster. What you need is an optimized algorithm for the problem. –  ja72 Aug 24 '11 at 1:21
    
It sounds like the order of the rectangles is important - "For all R[i = 0..n] and for all R[j = i+1..n] if R[i] overlaps R[j] then remove R[i]." If that's the case then I think you're stuck. Any form of problem partitioning will affect the order of the rectangles and hence will remove the wrong ones. The best performance you can get is n*(n-1)/2 operations for n rectangles. –  Enigmativity Aug 24 '11 at 2:05
    
Is this a correct statement of the problem: "given a list of rectangles, remove any rectangle from the list that is contained entirely within the bounds of any other rectangle in the list."? –  Jason Aug 24 '11 at 2:34
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1 Answer 1

The problem isn't eliminating for loops, at least in the way that you're thinking of it. Rewriting this in LINQ is just going to hide the for loops but they'll still be there. And that's the fundamental problem. Your algorithm, as written, is O(n^2) and that's why you see a ridiculous explosion in time as you go from 20,000 elements to 300,000 elements. You're doing 400,000,000 comparisons in the first case, and 90,000,000,000 in the second case and it will continue to grow like O(n^2).

So, the question you really want to ask is: is there an algorithm with time complexity better than O(n^2) for this problem?

Frankly, I don't know the answer to that question. I suspect that the answer is no: you can't know if a point is contained in some rectangle without comparing it to all the rectangles, and you have to inspect all the points. But maybe there's a clever way to do it such as computing the convex hull of all the rectangles and use that somehow?

This problem is an example of the field of computational geometry.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. I need to eliminate the duplicates with less amount of time. In other words, I want the RemoveIntersectedObjects method to be modified. –  Krishna Aug 24 '11 at 1:54
    
My first thought would be to traverse the list and find the largest rectangle. Then traverse the list and eliminate all rectangles contained within the largest. Does this linear (2x) pass reduce the size of the list to the point where it can be handled via your brute force approach? Or have you considered splitting up the list into subsets, processing them in parallel, then doing a brute force approach on the combined result set? –  Jason Aug 24 '11 at 2:32
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