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if have any xml file as below:

<soap env="abc" id="xyz">
<Workinstance name="ab" id="ab1">
<projectinstance name="cd" id="cd1">

I want to extract the id field in workinstance using unix script

I tried grep but, it is retrieving the whole xml file. Can someone help me how to get it?

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grep '<Workinstance.*id=' file.xml will filter id field –  Prince John Wesley Aug 24 '11 at 4:24
perl -nle 'print $1 if $_ =~ /workinstance.*?id=\"([^"]*)\"/i;' thexmlfile.xml grabs exactly what you want, but use an XML parser instead. –  Ray Toal Aug 24 '11 at 4:41
Still i am not able to do it. Can some one help me plz –  suvitha Aug 24 '11 at 5:14
You could ask follow-up questions to any answers you have difficulty using. –  luser droog Aug 25 '11 at 9:05

3 Answers 3

You might want to consider something like XMLStarlet, which implements the XPath/XQuery specifications.

Parsing XML with regular expressions is essentially impossible even under the best of conditions, so the sooner you give up on trying to do this with grep, the better off you're likely to be.

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+1, XMLStarlet has become an indispensable tool for me during the last year or so. –  Michael Kohl Aug 24 '11 at 15:40

If you have Ruby

$ ruby -ne 'print $_.gsub(/.*id=\"|\".*$/,"" ) if /<Workinstance/' file
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Ruby was not there. –  suvitha Aug 24 '11 at 5:13

XmlStarlet seems the tool I was looking for!

To do extract your tag, try to do the following:

cat your_file.xml | xmlstarlet sel -t -v 'soap/Workinstance/@id'

The "soap/Workinstance/@id" is an XPath expression that will get the id attribute inside Workinstance tag. By using "-v" flag, you ask xmlstarlet to print the extracted text to the standard output.

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