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Please forgive me if I repeat the question.

I have HTML that all elements inside a div tag has different id, suppose I have already get the reference to the div, is there any simple way to get the element by its id without iterate all elements with that div?

here is my sample html:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>
share|improve this question
2  
You can't have more than one element with the same id in the whole DOM tree... id must be unique, always. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 24 '11 at 6:48
2  
please dont use this. this is invalid markup. – naveen Aug 24 '11 at 6:49
    
As @PaulPROs answer indicates, you don't have HTML. You have something resembling HTML, but because you have multiple elements with the same id, it's invalid. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 24 '11 at 6:49
    
I know id SHOULD be unique. But some reason, I have to live with this kind of html. – eric2323223 Aug 24 '11 at 6:51
1  
@eric If you have to use HTML like that, you still can't expect Javascript to work well with it. It gives undefined behaviour. I provided a small script below that loops through the immediate children of div2 and provides each element that is an <input> to you. – Paulpro Aug 24 '11 at 6:59
up vote 28 down vote accepted

You may try something like this.

Sample Markup.

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" id="edit3" />
    <input type="text" id="edit4" />
</div>

JavaScript

function GetElementInsideContainer(containerID, childID) {
    var elm = {};
    var elms = document.getElementById(containerID).getElementsByTagName("*");
    for (var i = 0; i < elms.length; i++) {
        if (elms[i].id === childID) {
            elm = elms[i];
            break;
        }
    }
    return elm;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/naveen/H8j2A/

A better method as suggested by nnnnnn

function GetElementInsideContainer(containerID, childID) {
    var elm = document.getElementById(childID);
    var parent = elm ? elm.parentNode : {};
    return (parent.id && parent.id === containerID) ? elm : {};
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/naveen/4JMgF/

Call it like

var e = GetElementInsideContainer("div1", "edit1");
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your code. Seems that iterate is the only way, right? – eric2323223 Aug 24 '11 at 7:08
    
would you prefer using class instead of ids? – naveen Aug 24 '11 at 7:13
2  
This looping seems a bit pointless given that you've changed the markup to keep ID unique. If you already know the ID of the child element why would you not just get it directly using getElementById()? If the idea is to only return it if it is a child of a specific div you can still start by getting the child and then checking its parent. – nnnnnn Aug 24 '11 at 7:19
    
For completeness, in case anyone is looking for this, this one will give you the first item with tagName inside the first item with className that matches, or an empty object if nothing matches. – JVE999 Jun 26 '14 at 5:06

You don't want to do this. It is invalid HTML to have more than one element with the same id. Browsers won't treat that well, and you will have undefined behavior, meaning you have no idea what the browser will give you when you select an element by that id, it could be unpredictable.

You should be using a class, or just iterating through the inputs and keeping track of an index.

Try something like this:

var div2 = document.getElementById('div2');
for(i = j = 0; i < div2.childNodes.length; i++)
    if(div2.childNodes[i].nodeName == 'INPUT'){
        j++;
        var input = div2.childNodes[i];
        alert('This is edit'+j+': '+input);
    }

JSFiddle

share|improve this answer

A given ID can be only used once in a page. It's invalid HTML to have multiple objects with the same ID, even if they are in different parts of the page.

You could change your HTML to this:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" class="edit1" />
    <input type="text" class="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" class="edit1" />
    <input type="text" class="edit2" />
</div>

Then, you could get the first item in div1 with a CSS selector like this:

#div1 .edit1

On in jQuery:

$("#div1 .edit1")

Or, if you want to iterate the items in one of your divs, you can do it like this:

$("#div1 input").each(function(index) {
    // do something with one of the input objects
});

If I couldn't use a framework like jQuery or YUI, I'd go get Sizzle and include that for it's selector logic (it's the same selector engine as is inside of jQuery) because DOM manipulation is massively easier with a good selector library.

If I couldn't use even Sizzle (which would be a massive drop in developer productivity), you could use plain DOM functions to traverse the children of a given element.

You would use DOM functions like childNodes or firstChild and nextSibling and you'd have to check the nodeType to make sure you only got the kind of elements you wanted. I never write code that way because it's so much less productive than using a selector library.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't use jQuery either, could you show the javascript code without any framwork? I'm new to javascript. – eric2323223 Aug 24 '11 at 6:57
    
why not use class name instead of id. – simon xu Aug 24 '11 at 8:16
var x = document.getElementById("parent").querySelector("#child");
// don't forget a #

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent").querySelector("#child");

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent #child");

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent");
var y = x.querySelector("#child");

eg.

var x = document.querySelector("#div1").querySelector("#edit2");
share|improve this answer

In HTML ids should be unique. I suggest you change your code to something like this:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" name="edit1" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" name="edit2" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" name="edit1" id="edit3" />
    <input type="text" name="edit2" id="edit4" />
</div>
share|improve this answer
Sample Html code   
 <div id="temp">
        F1 <input type="text" value="111"/><br/>
        F2 <input type="text" value="222"/><br/>
        F3 <input type="text" value="333"/><br/>
        Type <select>
        <option value="A">A</option>
        <option value="B">B</option>
        <option value="C">C</option>
        </select>
        <input type="button" value="Go" onclick="getVal()">
    </div>

Javascript

    function  getVal()
    {
        var test = document.getElementById("temp").getElementsByTagName("input");
        alert("Number of Input Elements "+test.length);
        for(var i=0;i<test.length;i++)
        {
          if(test[i].type=="text")
          {
            alert(test[i].value);
          }
       }
      test = document.getElementById("temp").getElementsByTagName("select");
      alert("Select box  "+test[0].options[test[0].selectedIndex].text);
    }

By providing different tag names we can get all the values from the div.
share|improve this answer

Unfortunately this is invalid HTML. An ID has to be unique in the whole HTML file.

When you use Javascript's document.getElementById() it depends on the browser, which element it will return, mostly it's the first with a given ID.

You will have no other chance as to re-assign your IDs, or alternatively using the class attribute.

share|improve this answer

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