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My execution program won't work properly, for whatever reason.

#include <QtCore/QCoreApplication>
    #include <tinyxml/tinyxml.h>
    #include "classowner.h"
    #include "character.h"

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        Character * holland = new Character("Holland", HUMAN, MALE);
        delete &holland;
        std::cout << "Hello, World!" << std::endl;

        return 0;
    }

All my output states is that the program won't execute properly. The output doesn't display, however when I don't allocate the object, it will. Obviously, it's the object. What am I doing wrong?

Update

It appears the problem may be something more than deleting and allocating memory. Thus, I'm going to post the implementation behind the Character class.

Header:

#include <iostream>
#ifndef CHARACTER_H
#define CHARACTER_H

enum Race {HUMAN, DARK_ELF};
enum Gender {MALE, FEMALE};
class Character
{
public:
    Character();
    Character(std::string char_name, Race char_race, Gender char_gender);
    ~Character();

    int get_id() { return this->char_id; }
    std::string get_name() { return this->name; }
    Race get_race() { return this->race; }
    Gender get_gender() { return this->gender; }

private:
    int char_id;
    static int * char_count;
    std::string name;
    Race race;
    Gender gender;
};



  #endif // CHARACTER_H

//Source:

#include "character.h"
#include <iostream>

int * Character::char_count = 0;

Character::Character()
{
    this->char_id = *char_count;
    char_count++;
}

Character::Character(std::string char_name, Race char_race, Gender char_gender)
{
    this->char_id = *char_count;
    char_count++;
    this->name = char_name;
    this->race = char_race;
    this->gender = char_gender;
}

Character::~Character()
{

}
share|improve this question
    
You're deleting the memory which contains the pointer to your real object, which might not be in the heap/dynamic memory to release. Good that you've got exception. Sometimes, releasing wrong memory could end you up in serious memory corruption which requires hell lot of effort to figure out! –  sarat Aug 24 '11 at 6:56
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you try to dereference a null pointer:

int * Character::char_count = 0;

Both constructors of class Character do this

this->char_id = *char_count;

and that's an attempt to dereference a null pointer. That code makes no sense to me, I guess you could just use int instead of pointer:

int Character::char_count = 0;
//then
this->char_id = char_count;

Also here:

Character * holland = new Character("Holland", HUMAN, MALE);

you create an object of type class Character. You have to delete that object through a pointer to class Character - the pointer should have type Character*. Instead you try to use delete on a pointer of type Character**and that leads to undefined behavior.

So instead of

delete &holland;

you have to use

delete holland;
share|improve this answer
    
Rebuilt with the fix. Unfortunately, the same thing is happening still :(. Any other suggestions? –  blissfreak Aug 24 '11 at 7:17
    
@Holland: That should have fixed the initial problem. Maybe there's something with how Character class is implemented. You didn't show it to us. –  sharptooth Aug 24 '11 at 7:22
    
Updated for clarity. Thanks. –  blissfreak Aug 24 '11 at 7:38
    
@Holland: Updated. –  sharptooth Aug 24 '11 at 7:40
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delete &holland;

should be

delete holland;

Less profanity would be appreciated.

On the other hand, posting a short example that succinctly illustrates the problem is very much appreciated.

share|improve this answer
    
LOL, I may be a prude but I'm not a censor! –  john Aug 24 '11 at 6:55
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