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I have a django application using the SessionMiddleware running in mod_wsgi daemon mode with Apache. My Apache configuration also contains a standard mod_deflate config and mod_cache/mod_disk_cache for performance.

My problem is that the Vary: Cookie set by django's SessionMiddleware isn't being recognized correctly by mod_cache, which is serving cached versions of pages although the request cookies are different. Removing mod_deflate fixes the problem. Setting Vary: Cookie in Apache with mod_headers (regardless of the django middleware) also fixes the problem (this is my temporary workaround).

I have noticed, while playing around with this, that there seem to be cases where headers set inside the mod_wsgi app aren't properly recognized by some Apache modules that come afterwards, does this mean anything to anyone?

I've got very standard wsgi (attached) and Apache configs, let me know if any other data can help. I'm running stock ubuntu natty libapache2-mod-wsgi 3.3-2ubuntu2, Apache 2.2.17, django 1.3

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1 Answer 1

As first step, use:

http://code.google.com/p/modwsgi/wiki/DebuggingTechniques#Tracking_Request_and_Response

to verify what is actually coming out of the WSGI application and being passed to mod_wsgi.

I can't think of any reason why mod_wsgi would cause an issue and sounds more like an issue with Apache output filter ordering.

BTW, this is the sort of problem better handled on mod_wsgi mailing list. Debugging issues via StackOverflow sucks.

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Thanks for the suggestion! I can clearly see the Vary: Cookie header in the WSGI response, so that seems totally fine - I guess you're right that it's more about Apache output filter! –  Shay Aug 25 '11 at 14:27

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