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I have a joyful Flash AS3 conundrum. Given the following code:

public class BaseClass
{
  protected var _A:uint;
}

public class ExtendedClass extends BaseClass
{
  public static function readBaseA(a:BaseClass) : uint
  {
    return a._A;
  }
}

So you see, the static function is using its ability to read the protected member of BaseClass, to return _A.

But this does not compute, and Flash barks back at me with:

(hidden)\ExtendedClass.as, Line 7   1178: Attempted access of inaccessible property _A through a reference with static type BaseClass.

In Java, this is okay. And I consider Java the reference implementation of basic OO.

if I take away the 'static' from that readBaseA method, so that now it is an instance method, I still cannot read the _A from a BaseClass instance. But interestingly, I can read it from this._A.

It's like AS3 is differentiating between this's protected members, and other objects' protected members, although those objects may be instances of the same class as 'this'.

Anyone seen similar behaviour out there in the wild?

Rich

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Not sure what your question is, but yes this is how AS works. Whether it is "wrong" or not is a matter of opinion. –  this.lau_ Aug 24 '11 at 9:27

3 Answers 3

_A is protected so it can only be accessed from within the same class or it's sub-classes, and since it's not declared as static "class" in this regard actually means "class instance".

To clarify, an instance a cannot access a private or protected property of instance b, regardless of whether they have the exact same type or if one extends the other.

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1  
It is a contrived example, but makes sense when you replace BaseClass, ExtendedClass and _A with my real names. richardollson in other more reputable languages (like Java) this is allowed, even inside a static function where there is no this. –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 9:41
1  
@Laurent my question was "Anyone seen similar behaviour out there in the wild?". So I was hoping for knowledgable people confirming that the behaviour goes against general OO understanding and literature, OR that what I wanted to do was achieveable but I was using AS3 wrong. If I were Adobe, i'd have documented HOW my language worked when it strayed away from the general understanding of a language feature. But they haven't. Specifically, why in a static function in B (which extends A), can one not see the protected variables of a parameter of type A. –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 12:44
1  
@RichColours, you write that but you obviously haven't read the documentation. It's explicitly written that "The definition of protected in ActionScript 3.0 is more restrictive than that of protected in the Java programming language. In ActionScript 3.0 protected limits access strictly to subclasses.". help.adobe.com/en_US/FlashPlatform/reference/actionscript/3/… So yes - AS3 != Java, you don't expect every language on the planet to be like Java, do you? –  this.lau_ Aug 24 '11 at 13:44
1  
@Laurent Let's dissect that documentation. My use of protected is on an instance var in A, and B is a subclass of A. They are in the same package. So lets forget the package issue, it doesn't come into play here. You've clearly picked up on the word Java in that doc and have got a little fixated on it. My (static) function readBaseA() is a function in a subclass of A, and A is where the protected var is defined. Now, what part of that document says that it is not available in my context? It mentions nothing of static whatsoever. –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 14:21
1  
@RichCoulors: I agree that the linked document does not explicitly say that what you're trying to do isn't possible, because it speaks of classes only (disregarding the topic of instances.) This is a definite shortcoming. I've also had a look through the actual specification at the URL below, which also neglects to explain this. However, the bottom line is that ActionScript works this way. Whether or not that's "good" is a matter of opinion. livedocs.adobe.com/specs/actionscript/3/wwhelp/wwhimpl/js/html/… –  richardolsson Aug 24 '11 at 15:48

it'll work if you use internal instead of protected instance property. (if that is enough privacy for you)

ActionScript is very particular about what protected means, from Adobe:

"protected - Visible to references in the same class and derived classes."

So its only available to references specifically, and unfortunately in your case, they obviously mean instance references only. This might have something to do with the prototype-based implementation that ActionScript is built on, where its only checking the prototype object and not the constructor object to determine if access is allowed protected member.

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1  
I'm about to give up with "encapsulation" and make the whole bloody thing public, and get this project out the door! Sodding language. –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 9:39
1  
I agreed, I actually ran into a similar problem a few months ago, and I was able to to hide the property uisng internal because the base class and all of the inherited classes were in a very specific package, so for me internal and protected happened to provide a very similar scope for what I was doing. Coming from C# that wasn't the way that I expected to have to do it. –  32bitkid Aug 24 '11 at 9:46

that's how it works in AS3:

public class BaseClass
{
  protected var _A:uint;
}

public class ExtendedClass extends BaseClass
{
  public function readBaseA() : uint
  {
    return super._A;
  }
}

protected fields can be accessed and overriden from extended classes and are treated as private for any other case

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readBaseA() is static on ExtendedClass. So how can super._A be accessing an instance, if readBaseA() is static? –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 15:25
    
livedocs.adobe.com/specs/actionscript/3/wwhelp/wwhimpl/js/html/… details how super and this cannot be used in a static function. –  RichColours Aug 24 '11 at 15:53
    
@RichColours - it was a stupid copy-paste error, fixed my answer –  www0z0k Aug 25 '11 at 9:58
    
At this point, you could make readBaseA() private, and access it with static functions (in the same class) for an equivalent level of information hiding. –  Brilliand Oct 14 '11 at 3:32

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