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Update: clarification, more clear focus and shortened example:

  • Can I circumvent the M op+(M&&,M&&) overload? Assuming, I want good handling of RValues? I guess the other three overloads are required.

Reason why I have the (&&,&&) overload in the first place:

  • Normally I would not provide M op+(&&,&&), but I seem to need it: When providing overloads for (&&,&) and (&,&&) the compiler gets into an ambiguity. Is there a better way to resolve it then to add another implementation variant?

You can also look at the complete code.

struct Matrix {
...
  // 2ary ops
  friend Matrix operator+(const Matrix &a, Matrix &&b     ) { b+=a; return move(b); }
  friend Matrix operator+(Matrix &&a,      const Matrix &b) { a+=b; return move(a); }
  friend Matrix operator+(const Matrix &a, Matrix v)        { v+=a; return v; }
  friend Matrix operator+(Matrix &&a,      Matrix &&b)      { a+=b; return move(a); }
  // ... same for operator*
  // ... assume impl of operator+=,*= and move semantics
};

int main() {
  Matrix a{2},b{3},c{4},d{5};
  Matrix x = a*b + c*d;  // reuires &&,&& overload
  std::cout << x << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
-1: First, what's your question? You seem to be just saying, "Here's some code. What do you think?" Second, stop using &&. This is about the 6th question in several days where you've asked about these things. They are something that you should rarely use, and should only be used by people who are either writing a move constructor/assignment, writing a forwarding function, or who really know how they work. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 24 '11 at 10:25
1  
Oh, and BTW: accepted answers are not what you award to particularly good answers. They're what you give to the right answer. You've had a lot of perfectly acceptable answers in the past few days, but you've accepted very few of them. Indeed, you've posted a "Thanks" reply to some of them, but still didn't bother to accept them. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 24 '11 at 10:37
2  
@Nicol: I do accept answers. I usually wait a couple of days if not all my points covered to get everyone the chance, who might only look at stackoverflow once a week. Also, sometimes a discussion for some time is also helpful. Because there is a section where I can easily see what I did not accept yet, I do that regularly and see whats still open -- consolidating it. Be assured, I accept answers that are right, that helped me most. But there are also some, where I have nothing to accept. I take you input and check right now for open questions. –  towi Aug 24 '11 at 11:11
    
Ok, the first version of the question was too broad. I narrowed it down. –  towi Aug 24 '11 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

The following helper function returns the first value if it an rvalue, otherwise the second value (which may be an rvalue, but may not be).

template <class T1, class T2>
typename std::enable_if<! std::is_reference<T1>::value, T1&&>::type 
  get_rvalue(T1&& t1, T2&& t2) { return std::forward<T1>(t1); }

template <class T1, class T2>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_reference<T1>::value, T2&&>::type 
  get_rvalue(T1&& t1, T2&& t2) { return std::forward<T2>(t2); }     

The following helper function returns the other value not returned above.

template <class T1, class T2>
typename std::enable_if<! std::is_reference<T1>::value, T1&&>::type 
  get_non_rvalue(T1&& t1, T2&& t2) { return std::forward<T2>(t2); }

template <class T1, class T2>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_reference<T1>::value, T2&&>::type 
  get_non_rvalue(T1&& t1, T2&& t2) { return std::forward<T1>(t1); }

This just compares if two types are the same, ignoring references and const.

template <class T1, class T2>
struct is_same_decay : public std::is_same<
  typename std::decay<T1>::type, 
  typename std::decay<T2>::type
> {};

Then we can do just one overload for each function (using templates) like the following:

// 2ary ops
template <class M1, class M2>
friend typename std::enable_if< 
  is_same_decay<M1, Matrix>::value &&
  is_same_decay<M2, Matrix>::value,
Matrix>::type
operator+(M1&& a, M2&& b) 
{ 
  Matrix x = get_rvalue(std::forward<M1>(a), std::forward<M2>(b)); 
  x += get_non_rvalue(std::forward<M1>(a), std::forward<M2>(b)); 
  return x; 
}

template <class M1, class M2>
friend typename std::enable_if< 
  is_same_decay<M1, Matrix>::value &&
  is_same_decay<M2, Matrix>::value,
Matrix>::type
operator*(M1&& a, M2&& b) 
{ 
  Matrix x = get_rvalue(std::forward<M1>(a), std::forward<M1>(b)); 
  x *= get_non_rvalue(std::forward<M1>(a), std::forward<M1>(b)); 
  return x; 
}

Note above, if either M1 or M2 is an rvalue, get_rvalue(a, b) will return an rvalue, hence in this case Matrix x will be populated by a move, not a copy. Named return value optimisation will probably ensure that there is no copy (or even move) required into the return value, as x will be constructed in the place of the return value.

Full code is here.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I understand 80% of that. Does it also work if both args are RValues? Isn't there a case when get_rvalue(a,b) and get_non_rvalue(a,b) will return the same result (b, I think?) Also, should not the get_...() functions return forward<Tx>( tx ) to make be sure for all ref-kinds, to make it "perfect"? Third, just an observation: this definitely only works for operators that a commutative, right? But with your explanation I should be able to save some overloads for operator/(), too. –  towi Aug 30 '11 at 9:14
    
Fourth, I can not see how the compiler can get rid of the Matrix x = ... copy by named return value optimization (because I am not an expert with that. So, it does not mean he can not, of course). Is that just a "feeling" if yours, or are you sure? When I provide the "traditional" 4 overloads, I can see, that there will be no unnecessary (full) object construction. I do count only one (full) construction for an expressions like Matrix x = a+b+c*d+d*e*f+g*h. Are you sure that is also the case for your solution, with the Matrix x = ...? –  towi Aug 30 '11 at 9:26
1  
Hi towi. I've edited my answer and did a number of fixes. Now there should be a minimum of full object constructions, in the case of Matrix x = a*b+c*d, a*b must construct an object (as neither are temporaries) and c*d must construct (as again, neither are temporaries) but then the + in (a*b)+(c*d) can be done just using a move, as at least one of (a*b) and (c*d) are temporaries (in this case, both are). –  Clinton Aug 30 '11 at 14:55
    
You are right of course, the subexpressions create a temp. My original example was a+b*c+d, and I was to hasty expanding that. But I am glad I could contribute. I assume I may present your excellent code when I explain these things... –  towi Sep 2 '11 at 8:45
Matrix& operator=(Matrix&& o) { swap(*this,o); };

First, your Matrix class has nothing (as of yet) that needs moving, so you shouldn't bother writing one. Like a copy constructor, only define one if you need to. Let the compiler take care of it unless you have a legitimate need (like storing a naked pointer).

Second, that function of yours doesn't move; it swaps. An "idiomatic" swap-based move involves a temporary, like this:

Matrix temp;
swap(o, temp);
swap(temp, *this);

friend Matrix operator+(const Matrix &a, Matrix &&b     ) { b+=a; return move(b); }
friend Matrix operator+(Matrix &&a,      const Matrix &b) { a+=b; return move(a); }
friend Matrix operator+(const Matrix &a, Matrix v)        { v+=a; return v; }
friend Matrix operator+(Matrix &&a,      Matrix &&b)      { a+=b; return move(a); }

What are you trying to accomplish here? Again, your object doesn't have anything that gets moved; there's no point in doing this. Just because you could move something, doesn't mean you should. If you really wanted to cut down on code duplication, you would do things normally:

friend Matrix operator+(const Matrix &a, const Matrix &b) { Matrix temp = a + b; return temp; }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are right, in my first version of the question I had nothing to move. I overhauled the example code, assuming there is something to move. And in operator= there was an error, not returning this. –  towi Aug 24 '11 at 11:26

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