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I find myself writing lots and lots of boiler plate tests these days and I want to optimize away a lot of these basic tests in a clean way that can be added to all the current test classes without a lot of hassle.

Here is a basic test class:

class MyClassTest {

    @Test
    public void doesWhatItDoes() {
        assertEquals("foo",new MyClass("bar").get());
    }

}

Lets say if MyClass implements Serializable, then it stands to reason we want to ensure that it really is serializable. So I built a class which you can extend which contains a battery of standard tests which will be run along side the other tests.

My problem is that if MyClass does NOT implement Serializable for instance, we still have a serialization test in the class. We can make it just succeed for non-serializable classes but it still sticks around in the test list and once this class starts to build it will get more and more cluttered.

What I want to do is find a way to dynamically add those tests which are relevant to already existing test classes where appropriate. I know some of this can be done with a TestSuit but then you have to maintain two test classes per class and that will quickly become a hassle.

If anyone knows of a way to do it which doesn't require an eclipse plug-in or something like that, then I'd be forever grateful.

EDIT: Added a brief sample of what I described above;

class MyClassTest extend AutoTest<MyClass> {

    public MyClassTest() {
        super(MyClass.class);
    }

    @Test
    public void doesWhatItDoes() {
        assertEquals("foo",new MyClass("bar").get());
    }

}

public abstract class AutoTest<T> {
    private final Class<T> clazz;
    protected AutoTest(Clazz<T> clazz) {
        super();
        this.clazz = clazz;
    }

    @Test
    public void serializes() {
        if (Arrays.asList(clazz.getInterfaces()).contains(Serializable.class)) {
        /* Serialize and deserialize and check equals, hashcode and other things... */
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you want to unit test if a class that implements Serializable is really Serializable? Or was it just an example? –  Luciano Fiandesio Aug 24 '11 at 10:01
    
Yes, but there are other things I want to test too like nullability and such using the jsr-305 annotations. This is largely inspired by Guavas test framework, but it still requires a ton of boiler plate that I feel we should be able to avoid. –  Emily Aug 24 '11 at 10:05
    
IMHO, a unit test should focus solely on the class under test. If your objects aren't getting marshalled properly, a functional/integration test will catch it. –  Sahil Muthoo Aug 24 '11 at 10:28
2  
@Sahil Do you really want to wait until the integration tests run to detect this sort of bug? In my experience this sort of thing does catch bugs and allow you to refactor safely. –  Matthew Farwell Aug 24 '11 at 10:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two ideas.

Idea 1: Use Assume

A set of methods useful for stating assumptions about the conditions in which a test is meaningful. A failed assumption does not mean the code is broken, but that the test provides no useful information. The default JUnit runner treats tests with failing assumptions as ignored.

@Test
public void serializes() {
    assumeTrue(Serializable.class.isAssignableFrom(clazz));
    /* Serialize and deserialize and check equals, hashcode and other things... */
}

Idea 2: implement your own test runner.

Have a look at @RunWith and Runner at http://junit.sourceforge.net/javadoc/

share|improve this answer
    
That's fantastic, I can use assume to get around all the pesky issues with my approach and still keep it nice and manageable, Thanks! –  Emily Aug 24 '11 at 16:23
    
+1 For Assume - very useful! –  Bringer128 Aug 25 '11 at 7:26

Most pragmatic solution within existing capabilities of JUnit is to have a single annotated test:

@Test
void followsStandardJavaLibraryProtocols() {
    if (implementsInterface(Serializable.class) {
         testSerialisableInterface       

...

Breaks various abstract principles of TDD, but works, with no unnecessary cleverness.

Perhaps, instead of a flat list of test cases, Junit could be extended to have more straightforward support for this kind of heirarchical test with subtests. Something like a @Subtest annotation that identified a test not to be invoked directly, instead adding a node to the result tree when it was, and with what arguments.

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Your approach seems like a valid one to me. I don't have a problem with it.

I do this slightly differently. I would create another single test which tests all of your Serializable classes:

public class SerializablesTest {
    @Test
    public void serializes() {
        testSerializable(MyClass.class);
        testSerializable(MyClass2.class);
    }

    private testSerializable(Class clazz) {
        // do the real test here
        /* Serialize and deserialize and check equals, hashcode and other things... */
    }
}

What does this give you? For me, explicitness. I know that I am testing class MyClass for serializability. There isn't any magic involved. You don't need to pollute your other tests.

If you really need to test all your classes which implement Serializable, you can find all of your classes using reflection.

I use this approach a lot, using reflection to build objects. For instance, I can test that all fields are persisted to & reread from a database correctly. I use this sort of thing all of the time.

share|improve this answer
    
I would use TWIP twip.sourceforge.net for this approach. –  Cephalopod Aug 24 '11 at 12:53

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