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I sometimes declare classes in nested namespaces and when it comes to defining their member functions, I prefer not to have to qualify each one with these nested namespace names, especially if they are long-ish.

Adding "using namespace " (or, for more precise targetting, "using ::SomeClass") before I define the member functions seems to obviate the need to qualify each definition, but I can't find anywhere in the spec that guarantees this, and I'm worried that it might be a behaviour that only works with GCC. I note that there doesn't appear to be a similar mechanism for skipping the need to add the qualifiers when defining free functions(?).

As an example of what I mean:

Header:

// example.h
namespace SomeNamespace
{
    class SomeClass
    {
    public:
        void someMemberFunction();
    };

    void someFreeFunction();
};

Implementation:

// example.cpp
#include "example.h"

using namespace SomeNamespace;

void SomeClass::someMemberFunction()
{
    // OK: seems to define SomeNamespace::SomeClass::someMemberFunction(),
    // even though we didn't qualify it with SomeNamespace::
}

void someFreeFunction()
{
    // Not what we wanted; declares and defines ::someFreeFunction(), not
    // SomeNamespace::someFreeFunction() (quite understandably)
}

int main()
{
    SomeClass a;
    a.someMemberFunction(); // Ok; it is defined above.
    SomeNamespace::someFreeFunction(); // Undefined!
    return 0;
}

So my question: is the above way of definining SomeClass::someMemberFunction() legal, and where in the spec is this mentioned? If legal, is it advisable? It certainly cuts down on clutter! :)

Many thanks :)

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2  
Just out of interest: what is the problem with putting the definitions in a regular braced namespace ? (like you did with the declarations) –  ereOn Aug 24 '11 at 10:03
    
As long as you don't start using using namespace ... in headers you should be fine. Anyway, that's the intended use-case for using directive. –  RedX Aug 24 '11 at 10:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you define a member-function, the compiler realizes that it is a member-function that must belong to a previously declared class, so it looks that class up, as specified in Section 9.3.5 of the standard:

If the definition of a member function is lexically outside its class definition, the member function name shall be qualified by its class name using the :: operator. [Note: a name used in a member function definition (that is, in the parameter-declaration-clause including the default arguments (8.3.6), or in the member function body, or, for a constructor function (12.1), in a mem-initializer expression (12.6.2)) is looked up as described in 3.4. ] [Example:

struct X {
    typedef int T; 
    static T count; 
    void f(T); 
}; 

void X::f(T t = count) { }

The member function f of class X is defined in global scope; the notation X::f specifies that the function f is a member of class X and in the scope of class X. In the function definition, the parameter type T refers to the typedef member T declared in class X and the default argument count refers to the static data member count declared in class X. ]

Basically, what you are doing is fine. However, there is another (preferable) way to cut down on the clutter when using nested namespaces, or namespaces with long names (or both) - define an alias:

namespace short_name = averylong::nested::namespacename;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It's not clear to me from the standard-ese, though, that the "SomeClass" in the "SomeClass::someMethod" would be looked up in the way described in 3.4. Is this definitely the case? –  SSJ_GZ Aug 24 '11 at 10:13
1  
But don't use short since that is a datatype and as such a reserved keyword. –  RedX Aug 24 '11 at 10:14
    
@RedX: Good catch, fixed. –  Björn Pollex Aug 24 '11 at 10:15
    
@MrLunchtime: Section 3.4 defines the name-lookup of C++. SomeClass is a name, so it is looked up like one. –  Björn Pollex Aug 24 '11 at 10:17
    
@Björn Pollex: Ok, I'm convinced - many thanks for the help! –  SSJ_GZ Aug 24 '11 at 10:18

Perhaps I'm getting this wrong but if you have:

// example.h
namespace SomeNamespace
{
    class SomeClass
    {
    public:
        void someMemberFunction();
    };

    void someFreeFunction();
};

You can also simply write:

#include "example.h"

// example.cpp
namespace SomeNamespace
{
    void SomeClass::someMemberFunction()
    {
    }

    void someFreeFunction()
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's certainly one approach (and it seems one that is guaranteed to work), but I really dislike the clutter it adds (especially if you have nested namespaces). –  SSJ_GZ Aug 24 '11 at 10:09
1  
@MrLunchtime: if it is only a matter of visual reasons ("i really dislike the clutter it adds"), perhaps the problem is not in the code, but in your text-editor's configuration ? I usually work with namespaces like that (sometimes nested), and disregard of the 3 added lines for the namespace declaration, it looks all the same. –  ereOn Aug 24 '11 at 15:15
    
That would work, but (for purely reasons that are purely a matter of taste), I think I'd prefer to do the "using <nested namespaces>::SomeClass" method. Thanks, though :) –  SSJ_GZ Aug 24 '11 at 15:27

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