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I would suspect this is a simple question but I am not able to find an answer anywhere.

Does the ImageCraft compiler create a cpu frequency define? I know gcc-avr does in the form F_CPU but I have not been able to find a similar define for iccavr.

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I had a look at the online manual and found only a few predefined macros:

http://www.imagecraft.com/help/iccavr/wwhelp/wwhimpl/common/html/wwhelp.htm?context=ICCAVRHelp&file=5A-CPreprocessor2.html

It seems that a symbol for CPU frequency does not exist.

By the way, unless you can specify this somewhere in the Build options (i don't know because i've used this compiler a long time ago), the compiler doesn't really know what the avr frequency is. The microcontroller can run at different frequencies and oscillators (RC/XTAL) and the compiler does not really care because the machine code it generates will run in any case, it's the programmer responsability to take care of that.

But one thing that will come handy is the CPU type, for example if you need to make some code work on many CPUs where some registers have different names or bits meaning then you can #ifdef the appropriate symbol, like ATMega128 and handle the CPU-specific code.

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Thanks. So it is as I suspected. I know that the compiled code isn't affected by the clock frequency but still it would be nice if it was a project specific setting somewhere. –  Kenneth Aug 24 '11 at 11:44
    
You could define the frequency in a global symbol from the target settings, that's the same as the compiler would do. Or, you could set up a project-specific header shared by the all the low-level modules. –  Zmaster Aug 24 '11 at 18:36
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