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I did something like...

str = strcpy(str, arg[1]);
str = strcat(str, " ");
str = strcat(str, arg[2]);

what if i have 5 args???

how can i fix it??

share|improve this question

Write a loop:

char str[HUGE];
strcpy(str, argv[1]);

for (int i = 2; i < argc; ++i)
{
  strcat(str, " ");
  strcat(str, argv[i]);
}

You should first check that argc is at least 1, and it'd be better to use the lenght-limited functions strncpy and strncat instead, and track the lengths of each argument.

share|improve this answer
    
great solution.. thanks – user123456 Aug 24 '11 at 10:53
    
Perhaps accept this answer, then? (the check mark to the left of the answer, right under the "up-arrow number down-arrow") – Kaos Aug 24 '11 at 10:58

Loops FTW

for(i = 1; i < argc; i++)
{
    str = strcpy(str, arg[i]);
    str = strcat(str, " ");
}

Keep in mind this will add a trailing space at the end. You can remove it by inserting a NUL character at that position. Also do not forget to allocate enough space in str buffer, and to put a terminating NUL character.

share|improve this answer

You need to firstly check the length of the storage needed. If you have various arguments, the correct answer is using a loop.

int i;
int needed = 1;                        // plus end of string mark

for(i = 1; i < argc; ++i) {
    needed += strlen( argv[ i ] ) + 1; // plus space
}

Then you need to reserve the needed amount of memory, and using another loop, concatenate the strings:

char * storage = (char *) malloc( sizeof( char ) * needed );

strcpy( storage, argv[ 1 ] );

for( i = 2; i < argc; ++i) {
    strcat( storage, " " );
    strcat( storage, argv[ i ] );
}

And finally, use the space and free it.

printf( "%s\n", storage );
free( storage );

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

You can do a loop over arg array. Like

strcpy(str, arg[1]);
strcat(str, " ");

for ( i = 2; i < arg_array_size; i++ )
{
   strcat(str, arg[i]);
   strcat(str, " ");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
if you go to the trouble of doing the first one upfront it would be better to get invert the strcats in the loop and remove the initial strcatr, like in kerrek's solution... – fvu Aug 24 '11 at 10:58

You do not need to assign the returned value to str . Also if your string is stored in a static array then it is not correct.

With the below construct you can concatenate as you want.

char str[MAX];

strcpy (str, "");

for (i=0; i<argc; i++)
{
   strcat (str, argv[i]);
   strcat (str, " ");
}

here argc holds the count of the max elements. Note that the MAX should be large enough to hold all the concatenated strings. You can also do

char *str;
str = malloc (sizeof (char) * MAX);

to allocate memory dynamically. When allocated in this way, please remember to free the allocated memory when you have done working with the string.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int i;
  int len = 0;
  char *str = "";
  for(i=1; i<argc; i++)
  {
    len += strlen(argv[i]) + 1;
  }
  str = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * len);
  for(i=1; i<argc; i++)
  {
    strcat(str, argv[i]);
    strcat(str, " ");
  }
  printf("str = [%s]\n", cmds);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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