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I am fairly new to Perl threads so I would like to know the correct way to do this in Perl:

for $input (@inputs) {
  push @threads, start_thread($input);
}

for $thread (@threads) {
   wait_for_external_event();
   $thread->kick_thread_out_of_loop();
   $result = $thread->result();
   print $result;
}

sub my_thread {
  my $input = shift;
  while(1) {
    my $result = compute($best_result_so_far,$input);
    if($result > $best_result_so_far) {
      $best_result_so_far = $result;
    }
  }
  # The thread got kicked out of the loop
  return $best_result_so_far;
  do_some_cleanup_that_is_slow();
  exit thread;
}

I have the feeling the way to kick the thread out of the compute loop is by using signals and have a signal handler in the thread. But maybe there are even prettier ways to do that. I need some help on how exactly to implement that and especially how I can return $best_result_so_far and after the return do the slow cleanup. It is quite important that I do not have to wait for the cleanup before being able to get the result.

--- edit ---

I have looked at the tutorial, and I was unable to find examples of communicating with running threads ("join" only does dying threads). Can I get the result back from a running thread, similar to:

for $input (@inputs) {
  push @threads, start_thread($input);
}

for $thread (@threads) {
   wait_for_external_event();
   $result = $thread->result();
   $thread->kill("KILL");
   print $result;
}

package ThreadObj;

sub my_thread {
  my $self = shift;
  my $input = shift;

  local $SIG{KILL} = sub {
    do_slow_cleanup();
    threads->exit();
  };

  while(1) {
    my $result = compute($best_result_so_far,$input);
    if($result > $self->{'best_result_so_far'}) {
      $self->{'best_result_so_far'} = $result;
    }
  }
}

sub result {
  my $self = shift;
  wait until (defined $self->{'best_result_so_far'});
  return $self->{'best_result_so_far'};
}
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2 Answers 2

To my knowledge, it is not possible to return a result from a thread and defer thread cleanup to later.

If the $best_result_so_far is common across all threads (IOW there is only one best result), then threads::shared and semaphores may help (albeit at a performance cost). See perldoc perlthrtut for some good beginner examples.

It feels like this problem is more suited to an event-based programming paradigm. Might Coro::AnyEvent be the right tool for this job?

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It does sound like coroutines (as per Coro) could indeed work better than ordinary threads. –  bart Aug 24 '11 at 12:42
    
There is not one best result. The result depends on input and each thread gets different input. –  Ole Tange Aug 24 '11 at 13:50

I'd use a common datastructure or two for communication, where each thread uses its own unique id to access an entry in a shared hash to store its current results. Use a second hash, the same way, as a flag to signal to the thread that it's time to quit - or a single common scalar in case all threads have to quit at the same time. Instead of an endless loop, you loop for as long as the flag isn't set.

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