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There are some common code patterns I find in other people's Java code that can benefit from some simple refactoring.

What are your pet code pattern hates and their fixes (and the reason if it isn't obvious)?

I have taken to liberty of answering with a couple of my own pet hates.

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closed as not constructive by RoflcoptrException, NPE, amit, duffymo, Qwerky Aug 24 '11 at 12:32

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3  
Quote from the FAQ: "You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page." Please try to rephrase your question accordingly. –  Péter Török Aug 24 '11 at 11:18
    
Agree with Péter Török. To make it worse, you answer your own "question" with two almost identical answers. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 24 '11 at 11:19
    
Yes, but they're are not the same. They are different refactorings –  Bohemian Aug 24 '11 at 11:24

6 Answers 6

One of my favourite refactoring is using Strategy pattern instead of long if-else/switch statments. Eg.

String chooser = ""//some sting

if(testCond1(chooser)){
doSomething1();
} else if(testCond2(chooser)){
doSomethingElse2();
} else if(testCond2(chooser)){
doSomethingElse3();
} else if(testCond4(chooser)){
doSomethingElse4();
} else if(testCond5(chooser)){
doSomethingElse5();
} else if(testCond6(chooser)){
doSomethingElse6();
}

Can be changed to:

    Map<String, Handler> handlers = new HashMap<String, Handler>();

handlers.get(chooser).handle();

then we define a Handler interface

interface Handler{
    handle();
}

And for each condition we have a new class that implements the handler.

class CondOne implements Handler{
    handle(){
        //some code
    }
}

Pros. Object oriented approch, code is easier to maintain. It is also easy to add new conditions without changing the important parts of the code.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted
boolean someMethod() {
    if (<some test>) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

replace with

boolean someMethod() {
    return <some test>;
}

Guiding principles/patterns:

  • less code is good
  • redundant code is bad
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Why don't you merge your 2 answers? It would be easier and less confusing for the readers. If we have a complete answer, instead of searching through all answer to have a complete one. –  Rinzler Feb 17 at 17:08
void someMethod(SomeClass param) {
    if (param != null) { // or some other test
        // Rest of method code
    }
}

replace with:

void someMethod(SomeClass param) {
    if (param == null) { // or some other test
        return; // or throw exception if test expected to "always" pass
    }
    // Rest of method code
}

Guiding principles/patterns:

  • less indentation is good
  • shorter if blocks are good
  • parameter checking should be done early and exit on problem, rather than allowing code to execute on passing
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Actually you could raise an exception instead of just returning if a null parameter doesnt make sense. –  gregory561 Aug 24 '11 at 11:40
if (<some test>) {
    return someObject;
} else {
    return someOtherObject;
}

replace with:

if (<some test>) {
    return someObject;
}

return someOtherObject;

or for even more brevity and if the line isn't too long (ie you aren't creating the objects in-line):

return <some test> ? someObject : someOtherObject;

Guiding principles/patterns:

  • less code is good
  • redundant code is bad - when an if returns, there is no need for an "else"
  • less indentation is good
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4  
I would refactor your code :) I Always put curly braces on if statments. –  Farmor Aug 24 '11 at 11:20
    
braces added :) –  Bohemian Aug 24 '11 at 11:22
    
IMO it sucks. You introduce return statement that is similar to goto. I would do sth like that instead: SomeObject o = something; if(test){ o = sth; } –  gregory561 Aug 24 '11 at 11:44

I like enums and try to refactor code with a lot of string checks.

if (str.equals("A") {...}
else if (str.equals("B") {...}
else if (str.equals("C") {...}

to

switch (str){
 case A: ... ; break;
 case B: ... ; break;
 case C: ... ; break;

}

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1  
Java 7 should eliminate that need. It introduces switch on Strings. I believe NetBeans is capable of detected nested if-else constructs with String checks and turn those into switch statements. –  G_H Aug 24 '11 at 11:34
    
I would use a design pattern like strategy or chain of responsibilities instead. Long switch statments suck in general. –  gregory561 Aug 24 '11 at 11:42

Often I see code like this, when not references should be compared, but content.

if (someObject == anotherObject) {
   doSomething();
}

So I replace it with (and if necessary override equals() and hashCode()) :

if (someObject.equals(anotherObject))  {
   doSomething();
}
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1  
this is not just plain 'refactor', it's bug fixing. –  amit Aug 24 '11 at 11:34

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